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Mar. Drugs, Volume 5, Issue 3 (September 2007), Pages 52-135

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Cytotoxicity of the Ascidian Cystodytes dellechiajei Against Tumor Cells and Study of the Involvement of Associated Microbiota in the Production of Cytotoxic Compounds
Mar. Drugs 2007, 5(3), 52-70; doi:10.3390/md503052
Received: 18 June 2007 / Accepted: 17 July 2007 / Published: 19 July 2007
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (226 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Many cytotoxic compounds of therapeutic interest have been isolated from marine invertebrates, and some of them have been reported to be of microbial origin. Pyridoacridine alkaloids are the main compounds extracted from the ascidian Cystodytes dellechiajei. Here we describe the in [...] Read more.
Many cytotoxic compounds of therapeutic interest have been isolated from marine invertebrates, and some of them have been reported to be of microbial origin. Pyridoacridine alkaloids are the main compounds extracted from the ascidian Cystodytes dellechiajei. Here we describe the in vitro antiproliferative activity against different tumor cell lines of the ascidian extracts and provide some insights on the role of the microbial community associated with the tunicate in the production of these compounds. C. dellechiajei extracts showed remarkably high antiproliferative activity (IC50 ≤5 μg/mL) in human lung carcinoma A-549, colon adenocarcinoma H-116, pancreatic adenocarcinoma PSN-1 and breast carcinoma SKBR3 cell lines. Moreover, we found that the maximum activity was located in the tunic tissue of the colony, which harbours a microbial community. In order to ascertain the involvement of this community in the synthesis of the bioactive compounds different approachs that included culture and culture independent methods were carried out. We undertook a screening for antiproliferative activities of the bacterial isolates from the ascidian, as well as a comprative analysis of the cytotoxic activities and the microbial communities from two color morphs of the ascidian, green and blue. In addition, the changes of the antiproliferative activities and the composition of the microbial communities were studied from ascidians kept in aquaria and treated with antibiotics for one month. Our data obtained from the different experiments did not point out to bacteria as the source of the cytotoxic compounds, suggesting thus an ascidian origin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds from Marine Microorganisms)
Open AccessArticle Cytoskyrins and Cytosporones Produced by Cytospora sp. CR200: Taxonomy, Fermentation and Biological Activities
Mar. Drugs 2007, 5(3), 71-84; doi:10.3390/md503071
Received: 22 June 2007 / Accepted: 8 July 2007 / Published: 19 July 2007
Cited by 20 | PDF Full-text (149 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Correction
Abstract
In screening endophytic fungi from Costa Rica for bioactivity, fungal culture CR200, isolated from a buttonwood tree, was found to contain compounds that initiate DNA damage in a test strain of E. coli (Biochemical Induction Assay, BIA) and inhibit growth of Gram-positive [...] Read more.
In screening endophytic fungi from Costa Rica for bioactivity, fungal culture CR200, isolated from a buttonwood tree, was found to contain compounds that initiate DNA damage in a test strain of E. coli (Biochemical Induction Assay, BIA) and inhibit growth of Gram-positive bacteria, including antibiotic-resistant strains. Two new bisanthraquinones (cytoskyrins A and B) and five new related octaketides (cytosporones A-E) were isolated from fermentation broths of this fungus. Cytoskyrin A exhibited potent in-vitro antibacterial (MICs against Gram-positive bacteria, 0.03 - 0.25 μg/mL) and DNA-damaging activities (10 ng/spot), whereas cytoskyrin B was inactive in these assays. Among the cytosporones, only D and E exhibited Gram-positive activity, but they were inactive in the BIA. Mechanistically, cytoskyrin A specifically inhibited DNA synthesis in E. coli imp at its MIC; however, it also moderately inhibited protein synthesis at 2x its MIC. Cytoskyrin A exhibited poor cytotoxicity against tumor cell lines (IC50 > 5 μg/mL) compared to known antitumor agents. The nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region of CR200 was found to share highest similarity (94-96%) with Cytospora spp. Micro- and macroscopic morphological observations of the conidia and conidiomata, respectively, also suggested this fungus to be a Cytospora sp. Full article
Open AccessArticle Differential Effects of Domoic Acid and E. coli Lipopolysaccharide on Tumor Necrosis Factor-α, Transforming Growth Factor-β1 and Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Release by Rat Neonatal Microglia: Evaluation of the Direct Activation Hypothesis
Mar. Drugs 2007, 5(3), 113-135; doi:10.3390/md503113
Received: 24 August 2007 / Accepted: 20 September 2007 / Published: 24 September 2007
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (764 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The excitatory amino acid domoic acid is the causative agent of amnesic shellfish poisoning in humans. The in vitro effects of domoic acid on rat neonatal brain microglia were compared with E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a known activator of microglia mediator release [...] Read more.
The excitatory amino acid domoic acid is the causative agent of amnesic shellfish poisoning in humans. The in vitro effects of domoic acid on rat neonatal brain microglia were compared with E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a known activator of microglia mediator release over a 4 to 24 hour observation period. LPS [3 ng/mL] but not domoic acid [1mM] stimulated a statistically significant increase in TNF-α mRNA and protein generation. Furthermore, both LPS and domoic acid did not significantly affect TGF- β1 gene expression and protein release. Finally, an in vitro exposure of microglia to LPS resulted in statistically significant MMP-9 expression and release, thus extending and confirming our previous observations. However, in contrast, no statistically significant increase in MMP-9 expression and release was observed after domoic acid treatment. Taken together our observations do not support the hypothesis that a short term (4 to 24 hours) in vitro exposure to domoic acid, at a concentration toxic to neuronal cells, activates rat neonatal microglia and the concomitant release of the pro-inflammatory mediators tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9), as well as the anti- inflammatory cytokine transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Toxins)

Review

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Open AccessReview Molecular Structure of Endotoxins from Gram-negative Marine Bacteria: An Update
Mar. Drugs 2007, 5(3), 85-112; doi:10.3390/md503085
Received: 27 August 2007 / Accepted: 17 September 2007 / Published: 19 September 2007
Cited by 32 | PDF Full-text (187 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Marine bacteria are microrganisms that have adapted, through millions of years, to survival in environments often characterized by one or more extreme physical or chemical parameters, namely pressure, temperature and salinity. The main interest in the research on marine bacteria is due [...] Read more.
Marine bacteria are microrganisms that have adapted, through millions of years, to survival in environments often characterized by one or more extreme physical or chemical parameters, namely pressure, temperature and salinity. The main interest in the research on marine bacteria is due to their ability to produce several biologically active molecules, such as antibiotics, toxins and antitoxins, antitumor and antimicrobial agents. Nonetheless, lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), or their portions, from Gram-negative marine bacteria, have often shown low virulence, and represent potential candidates in the development of drugs to prevent septic shock. Besides, the molecular architecture of such molecules is related to the possibility of thriving in marine habitats, shielding the cell from the disrupting action of natural stress factors. Over the last few years, the depiction of a variety of structures of lipids A, core oligosaccharides and O-specific polysaccharides from LPSs of marine microrganisms has been given. In particular, here we will examine the most recently encountered structures for bacteria belonging to the genera Shewanella, Pseudoalteromonas and Alteromonas, of the γ-Proteobacteria phylum, and to the genera Flavobacterium, Cellulophaga, Arenibacter and Chryseobacterium, of the Cytophaga- Flavobacterium-Bacteroides phylum. Particular attention will be paid to the chemical features expressed by these structures (characteristic monosaccharides, non-glycidic appendages, phosphate groups), to the typifying traits of LPSs from marine bacteria and to the possible correlation existing between such features and the adaptation, over years, of bacteria to marine environments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Toxins)

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