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Sensors 2018, 18(1), 5; doi:10.3390/s18010005

Real Time Analysis of Bioanalytes in Healthcare, Food, Zoology and Botany

1
Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
2
School of Engineering Design, Technology and Professional Programs, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
3
Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
These authors contribute equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 30 November 2017 / Revised: 16 December 2017 / Accepted: 17 December 2017 / Published: 21 December 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer-Based Sensors for Bioanalytes)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [3858 KB, uploaded 21 December 2017]   |  

Abstract

The growing demand for real time analysis of bioanalytes has spurred development in the field of wearable technology to offer non-invasive data collection at a low cost. The manufacturing processes for creating these sensing systems vary significantly by the material used, the type of sensors needed and the subject of study as well. The methods predominantly involve stretchable electronic sensors to monitor targets and transmit data mainly through flexible wires or short-range wireless communication devices. Capable of conformal contact, the application of wearable technology goes beyond the healthcare to fields of food, zoology and botany. With a brief review of wearable technology and its applications to various fields, we believe this mini review would be of interest to the reader in broad fields of materials, sensor development and areas where wearable sensors can provide data that are not available elsewhere. View Full-Text
Keywords: bioanalytes; wearable technology; biosensors; healthcare; food; zoology; botany bioanalytes; wearable technology; biosensors; healthcare; food; zoology; botany
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Wang, T.; Ramnarayanan, A.; Cheng, H. Real Time Analysis of Bioanalytes in Healthcare, Food, Zoology and Botany. Sensors 2018, 18, 5.

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