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Sensors 2017, 17(8), 1875; https://doi.org/10.3390/s17081875

Octopus: A Design Methodology for Motion Capture Wearables

1
IDERGO (Research and Development in Ergonomics) Research Group, I3A (Aragon Institute of Engineering Research), University of Zaragoza, C/Mariano Esquillor s/n, 50018 Zaragoza, Spain
2
HOWLab (Human Openware Research Lab) Research Group, I3A (Aragon Institute of Engineering Research), University of Zaragoza, C/Mariano Esquillor s/n, 50018 Zaragoza, Spain
3
Department of Design and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Zaragoza, C/María de Luna, 3, 50018 Zaragoza, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 3 July 2017 / Revised: 9 August 2017 / Accepted: 9 August 2017 / Published: 15 August 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Sensors Technology in Spain 2017)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [8283 KB, uploaded 15 August 2017]   |  

Abstract

Human motion capture (MoCap) is widely recognised for its usefulness and application in different fields, such as health, sports, and leisure; therefore, its inclusion in current wearables (MoCap-wearables) is increasing, and it may be very useful in a context of intelligent objects interconnected with each other and to the cloud in the Internet of Things (IoT). However, capturing human movement adequately requires addressing difficult-to-satisfy requirements, which means that the applications that are possible with this technology are held back by a series of accessibility barriers, some technological and some regarding usability. To overcome these barriers and generate products with greater wearability that are more efficient and accessible, factors are compiled through a review of publications and market research. The result of this analysis is a design methodology called Octopus, which ranks these factors and schematises them. Octopus provides a tool that can help define design requirements for multidisciplinary teams, generating a common framework and offering a new method of communication between them. View Full-Text
Keywords: design methodology; design requirements; wearables; MoCap; body positioning; body attachment; IMU; rigid bodies design methodology; design requirements; wearables; MoCap; body positioning; body attachment; IMU; rigid bodies
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Marin, J.; Blanco, T.; Marin, J.J. Octopus: A Design Methodology for Motion Capture Wearables. Sensors 2017, 17, 1875.

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