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Sensors 2017, 17(10), 2338; https://doi.org/10.3390/s17102338

Automated Epileptic Seizure Detection Based on Wearable ECG and PPG in a Hospital Environment

1
KU Leuven, Department of Electrical Engineering (ESAT), STADIUS Center for Dynamical Systems, Signal Processing and Data Analytics, Leuven 3001, Belgium
2
imec, Leuven 3001, Belgium
3
KU Leuven, University Hospital, Department of Neurosciences, Leuven 3000, Belgium
4
UCB, Brussels 1070, Belgium
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 1 September 2017 / Revised: 6 October 2017 / Accepted: 10 October 2017 / Published: 13 October 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wearable and Ambient Sensors for Healthcare and Wellness Applications)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [361 KB, uploaded 13 October 2017]   |  

Abstract

Electrocardiography has added value to automatically detect seizures in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients. The wired hospital system is not suited for a long-term seizure detection system at home. To address this need, the performance of two wearable devices, based on electrocardiography (ECG) and photoplethysmography (PPG), are compared with hospital ECG using an existing seizure detection algorithm. This algorithm classifies the seizures on the basis of heart rate features, extracted from the heart rate increase. The algorithm was applied to recordings of 11 patients in a hospital setting with 701 h capturing 47 (fronto-)temporal lobe seizures. The sensitivities of the hospital system, the wearable ECG device and the wearable PPG device were respectively 57%, 70% and 32%, with corresponding false alarms per hour of 1.92, 2.11 and 1.80. Whereas seizure detection performance using the wrist-worn PPG device was considerably lower, the performance using the wearable ECG is proven to be similar to that of the hospital ECG. View Full-Text
Keywords: epilepsy; seizure detection; home monitoring; long-term monitoring; wearables; photoplethysmography; electrocardiography epilepsy; seizure detection; home monitoring; long-term monitoring; wearables; photoplethysmography; electrocardiography
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Vandecasteele, K.; De Cooman, T.; Gu, Y.; Cleeren, E.; Claes, K.; Paesschen, W.V.; Huffel, S.V.; Hunyadi, B. Automated Epileptic Seizure Detection Based on Wearable ECG and PPG in a Hospital Environment. Sensors 2017, 17, 2338.

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