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Sensors 2016, 16(12), 2073; doi:10.3390/s16122073

Disposable, Paper-Based, Inkjet-Printed Humidity and H2S Gas Sensor for Passive Sensing Applications

1
Research Institute for Microwave and Millimeterwave Studies (RIMMS), National University of Sciences and Technology (NUST), Islamabad 44000, Pakistan
2
Computer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering (CEMSE), King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal 23955-6900, Saudi Arabia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Eduard Llobet and Stella Vallejos
Received: 31 July 2016 / Revised: 26 November 2016 / Accepted: 28 November 2016 / Published: 6 December 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gas Nanosensors)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [5936 KB, uploaded 6 December 2016]   |  

Abstract

An inkjet-printed, fully passive sensor capable of either humidity or gas sensing is presented herein. The sensor is composed of an interdigitated electrode, a customized printable gas sensitive ink and a specialized dipole antenna for wireless sensing. The interdigitated electrode printed on a paper substrate provides the base conductivity that varies during the sensing process. Aided by the porous nature of the substrate, a change in relative humidity from 18% to 88% decreases the electrode resistance from a few Mega-ohms to the kilo-ohm range. For gas sensing, an additional copper acetate-based customized ink is printed on top of the electrode, which, upon reaction with hydrogen sulphide gas (H2S) changes, both the optical and the electrical properties of the electrode. A fast response time of 3 min is achieved at room temperature for a H2S concentration of 10 ppm at a relative humidity (RH) of 45%. The passive wireless sensing is enabled through an antenna in which the inner loop takes care of conductivity changes in the 4–5 GHz band, whereas the outer-dipole arm is used for chipless identification in the 2–3 GHz band. View Full-Text
Keywords: chipless radio frequency identification; gas sensor; hydrogen sulfide gas; inkjet printing; internet-of-things; paper substrate; wireless applications chipless radio frequency identification; gas sensor; hydrogen sulfide gas; inkjet printing; internet-of-things; paper substrate; wireless applications
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Quddious, A.; Yang, S.; Khan, M.M.; Tahir, F.A.; Shamim, A.; Salama, K.N.; Cheema, H.M. Disposable, Paper-Based, Inkjet-Printed Humidity and H2S Gas Sensor for Passive Sensing Applications. Sensors 2016, 16, 2073.

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