Next Article in Journal
Design of the MEMS Piezoresistive Electronic Heart Sound Sensor
Next Article in Special Issue
Smart Toys Designed for Detecting Developmental Delays
Previous Article in Journal
Simultaneous Life Detection and Localization Using a Wideband Chaotic Signal with an Embedded Tone
Previous Article in Special Issue
When Ultrasonic Sensors and Computer Vision Join Forces for Efficient Obstacle Detection and Recognition
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Sensors 2016, 16(11), 1864; doi:10.3390/s16111864

Calorimetry Minisensor for the Localised Measurement of Surface Heat Dissipated from the Human Body

Departamento de Física, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria E-35017, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Octavian Adrian Postolache, Alex Casson and Subhas Chandra Mukhopadhyay
Received: 21 September 2016 / Revised: 28 October 2016 / Accepted: 3 November 2016 / Published: 6 November 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensing Technology for Healthcare System)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [6241 KB, uploaded 8 November 2016]   |  

Abstract

We have developed a calorimetry sensor that can perform a local measurement of the surface heat dissipated from the human body. The operating principle is based on the law of conductive heat transfer: heat dissipated by the human body passes across a thermopile located between the individual and a thermostat. Body heat power is calculated from the signals measured by the thermopile and the amount of power dissipated across the thermostat in order to maintain a constant temperature. The first prototype we built had a detection area measuring 6 × 6 cm2, while the second prototype, which is described herein, had a 2 × 2 cm2 detection area. This new design offers three advantages over the initial one: (1) greater resolution and three times greater thermal sensitivity; (2) a twice as fast response; and (3) it can take measurements from smaller areas of the body. The sensor has a 5 mW resolution, but the uncertainty is greater, up to 15 mW, due to the measurement and calculation procedure. The order of magnitude of measurements made in healthy subjects ranged from 60 to 300 mW at a thermostat temperature of 28 °C and an ambient room temperature of 21 °C. The values measured by the sensor depend on the ambient temperature and the thermostat’s temperature, while the power dissipated depends on the individual’s metabolism and any physical and/or emotional activity. View Full-Text
Keywords: direct calorimetry; heat conduction calorimeters; isothermal calorimeters; medical calorimetry; non-differential calorimeters direct calorimetry; heat conduction calorimeters; isothermal calorimeters; medical calorimetry; non-differential calorimeters
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Socorro, F.; Rodríguez de Rivera, P.J.; Rodríguez de Rivera, M. Calorimetry Minisensor for the Localised Measurement of Surface Heat Dissipated from the Human Body. Sensors 2016, 16, 1864.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Sensors EISSN 1424-8220 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top