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Sensors 2015, 15(5), 11873-11888; doi:10.3390/s150511873

Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) Resonators for Monitoring Conditioning Film Formation

1
Institute of Microstructure Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany
2
Institute of Functional Interfaces, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Gerhard Lindner
Received: 2 April 2015 / Accepted: 17 May 2015 / Published: 21 May 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Acoustic Waveguide Sensors)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1740 KB, uploaded 21 May 2015]   |  

Abstract

We propose surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators as a complementary tool for conditioning film monitoring. Conditioning films are formed by adsorption of inorganic and organic substances on a substrate the moment this substrate comes into contact with a liquid phase. In the case of implant insertion, for instance, initial protein adsorption is required to start wound healing, but it will also trigger immune reactions leading to inflammatory responses. The control of the initial protein adsorption would allow to promote the healing process and to suppress adverse immune reactions. Methods to investigate these adsorption processes are available, but it remains difficult to translate measurement results into actual protein binding events. Biosensor transducers allow user-friendly investigation of protein adsorption on different surfaces. The combination of several transduction principles leads to complementary results, allowing a more comprehensive characterization of the adsorbing layer. We introduce SAW resonators as a novel complementary tool for time-resolved conditioning film monitoring. SAW resonators were coated with polymers. The adsorption of the plasma proteins human serum albumin (HSA) and fibrinogen onto the polymer-coated surfaces were monitored. Frequency results were compared with quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor measurements, which confirmed the suitability of the SAW resonators for this application. View Full-Text
Keywords: surface acoustic wave (SAW); two-port resonator; conditioning film; human serum albumin (HSA); fibrinogen; plasma protein; implants; quartz crystal microbalance (QCM-D); polymer surface acoustic wave (SAW); two-port resonator; conditioning film; human serum albumin (HSA); fibrinogen; plasma protein; implants; quartz crystal microbalance (QCM-D); polymer
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Hohmann, S.; Kögel, S.; Brunner, Y.; Schmieg, B.; Ewald, C.; Kirschhöfer, F.; Brenner-Weiß, G.; Länge, K. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) Resonators for Monitoring Conditioning Film Formation. Sensors 2015, 15, 11873-11888.

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