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Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(9), 1505; doi:10.3390/ijms17091505

Circulating Tumor Cells (CTC) and Cell-Free DNA (cfDNA) Workshop 2016: Scientific Opportunities and Logistics for Cancer Clinical Trial Incorporation

1
London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON N6K 4L6, Canada
2
Special Hematology/Flow Cytometry, London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON N6K 4L6, Canada
3
Departments of Radiation Oncology and Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5G 1L7, Canada
4
Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, ON M5G 1L7, Canada
5
Epic Sciences Inc., San Diego, CA 92121, USA
6
Campbell Family Institute for Breast Cancer Research and Laboratory Medicine Program, University Health Network, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4, Canada
7
Departments of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, and Medical Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4, Canada
8
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3M2, Canada
9
Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3M2, Canada
10
Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3M2, Canada
11
Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, Cancer Care Manitoba, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3E 0V9, Canada
12
Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada
13
Vancouver Prostate Centre and Department of Urologic Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6H 3Z6, Canada
14
Departments of Anatomy & Cell Biology and Oncology, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6K 4L6, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Dario Marchetti
Received: 15 July 2016 / Revised: 26 August 2016 / Accepted: 31 August 2016 / Published: 8 September 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Circulating Tumor Cells)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [573 KB, uploaded 8 September 2016]   |  

Abstract

Despite the identification of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and cell-free DNA (cfDNA) as potential blood-based biomarkers capable of providing prognostic and predictive information in cancer, they have not been incorporated into routine clinical practice. This resistance is due in part to technological limitations hampering CTC and cfDNA analysis, as well as a limited understanding of precisely how to interpret emergent biomarkers across various disease stages and tumor types. In recognition of these challenges, a group of researchers and clinicians focused on blood-based biomarker development met at the Canadian Cancer Trials Group (CCTG) Spring Meeting in Toronto, Canada on 29 April 2016 for a workshop discussing novel CTC/cfDNA technologies, interpretation of data obtained from CTCs versus cfDNA, challenges regarding disease evolution and heterogeneity, and logistical considerations for incorporation of CTCs/cfDNA into clinical trials, and ultimately into routine clinical use. The objectives of this workshop included discussion of the current barriers to clinical implementation and recent progress made in the field, as well as fueling meaningful collaborations and partnerships between researchers and clinicians. We anticipate that the considerations highlighted at this workshop will lead to advances in both basic and translational research and will ultimately impact patient management strategies and patient outcomes. View Full-Text
Keywords: oncology; circulating tumor cells (CTC); cell-free DNA (cfDNA); circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA); clinical trials; conference report oncology; circulating tumor cells (CTC); cell-free DNA (cfDNA); circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA); clinical trials; conference report
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lowes, L.E.; Bratman, S.V.; Dittamore, R.; Done, S.; Kelley, S.O.; Mai, S.; Morin, R.D.; Wyatt, A.W.; Allan, A.L. Circulating Tumor Cells (CTC) and Cell-Free DNA (cfDNA) Workshop 2016: Scientific Opportunities and Logistics for Cancer Clinical Trial Incorporation. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17, 1505.

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