Next Article in Journal
Lactate as a Metabolite and a Regulator in the Central Nervous System
Next Article in Special Issue
Phyllanthus emblica Fruit Extract Activates Spindle Assembly Checkpoint, Prevents Mitotic Aberrations and Genomic Instability in Human Colon Epithelial NCM460 Cells
Previous Article in Journal
Sugarcane Serine Peptidase Inhibitors, Serine Peptidases, and Clp Protease System Subunits Associated with Sugarcane Borer (Diatraea saccharalis) Herbivory and Wounding
Previous Article in Special Issue
Potential of Pseudoshikonin I Isolated from Lithospermi Radix as Inhibitors of MMPs in IL-1β-Induced SW1353 Cells
Article Menu
Issue 9 (September) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(9), 1456; doi:10.3390/ijms17091456

Evaluation of Anthelmintic Activity and Composition of Pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo L.) Seed Extracts—In Vitro and in Vivo Studies

1
Department of Parasitology and Invasive Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Life Sciences in Lublin, 12 Akademicka Street, 20-950 Lublin, Poland
2
Department of Molecular Biology, Institute of Genetics and Animal Breeding, Polish Academy of Science, Jastrzebiec, 05-552 Magdalenka, Poland
3
Chair and Department of Pharmacognosy with Medicinal Plants Unit, Medical University of Lublin, 20-084 Lublin, Poland
4
Faculty of Biology and Animal Breeding, Department of Biological Basis of Animal Production, University of Life Sciences in Lublin, 20-950 Lublin, Poland
5
Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, 30-060 Krakow, Poland
6
Jagiellonian Centre for Experimental Therapeutics (JCET), Jagiellonian University, 30-348 Krakow, Poland
7
School of Life Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK
8
Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Zambia, P.O. Box 32379 Lusaka, Zambia
9
Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology & Wildlife Management, Faculty of Biology and Animal Breeding, University of Life Sciences in Lublin, 13 Akademicka Street, 20-950 Lublin, Poland
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Maurizio Battino
Received: 9 July 2016 / Revised: 10 August 2016 / Accepted: 12 August 2016 / Published: 1 September 2016
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1931 KB, uploaded 1 September 2016]   |  

Abstract

A significant number of studies report growing resistance in nematodes thriving in both humans and livestock. This study was conducted to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo anthelmintic efficiency of Curcubita pepo (C. pepo) L. hot water extract (HWE), cold water extract (CWE) or ethanol extract (ETE) on two model nematodes: Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) and Heligmosoides bakeri (H. bakeri). Methods: Raman, IR and LC-MS spectroscopy analyses were performed on the studied plant material to deliver qualitative and quantitative data on the composition of the obtained extracts: ETE, HWE and CWE. The in vitro activity evaluation showed an impact of C. pepo extracts on C. elegans and different developmental stages of H. bakeri. The following in vivo experiments on mice infected with H. bakeri confirmed inhibitory properties of the most active pumpkin extract selected by the in vitro study. All of the extracts were found to contain cucurbitine, aminoacids, fatty acids, and-for the first time-berberine and palmatine were identified. All C. pepo seed extracts exhibited a nematidicidal potential in vitro, affecting the survival of L1 and L2 H. bakeri larvae. The ETE was the strongest and demonstrated a positive effect on H. bakeri eggs hatching and marked inhibitory properties against worm motility, compared to a PBS control. No significant effects of pumpkin seed extracts on C. elegans integrity or motility were found. The EtOH extract in the in vivo studies showed anthelmintic properties against both H. bakeri fecal egg counts and adult worm burdens. The highest egg counts reduction was observed for the 8 g/kg dose (IC50 against H. bakeri = 2.43; 95% Cl = 2.01–2.94). A decrease in faecal egg counts (FEC) was accompanied by a significant reduction in worm burden of the treated mice compared to the control group. Conclusions: Pumpkin seed extracts may be used to control of Gastrointestinal (G.I.) nematode infections. This relatively inexpensive alternative to the currently available chemotherapeutic should be considered as a novel drug candidate in the nearest future. View Full-Text
Keywords: Cucurbitaceae; Heligmosoides bakeri; Caenorhabditis elegans; anthelmintics; spectroscopy; plant extracts; berberine; LC-ESI-MS; in vivo studies; pumpkin Cucurbitaceae; Heligmosoides bakeri; Caenorhabditis elegans; anthelmintics; spectroscopy; plant extracts; berberine; LC-ESI-MS; in vivo studies; pumpkin
Figures

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Grzybek, M.; Kukula-Koch, W.; Strachecka, A.; Jaworska, A.; Phiri, A.M.; Paleolog, J.; Tomczuk, K. Evaluation of Anthelmintic Activity and Composition of Pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo L.) Seed Extracts—In Vitro and in Vivo Studies. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17, 1456.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Mol. Sci. EISSN 1422-0067 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top