Next Article in Journal
Effect of Chromatin Structure on the Extent and Distribution of DNA Double Strand Breaks Produced by Ionizing Radiation; Comparative Study of hESC and Differentiated Cells Lines
Previous Article in Journal
Redox-Responsive Porphyrin-Based Polysilsesquioxane Nanoparticles for Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer Cells
Article Menu
Issue 1 (January) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessReview
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(1), 53; doi:10.3390/ijms17010053

Cardiovascular Dysfunction Following Burn Injury: What We Have Learned from Rat and Mouse Models

1
Department of Surgery, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd., Galveston, TX 77555, USA
2
Shriners Hospitals for Children®—Galveston, 815 Market St. Galveston, TX 77550, USA
3
Institute for Translational Sciences, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd., Galveston, TX 77555, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Julian Borejdo
Received: 28 September 2015 / Revised: 14 December 2015 / Accepted: 23 December 2015 / Published: 2 January 2016
(This article belongs to the Section Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular Biology)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [404 KB, uploaded 2 January 2016]   |  

Abstract

Severe burn profoundly affects organs both proximal and distal to the actual burn site. Cardiovascular dysfunction is a well-documented phenomenon that increases morbidity and mortality following a massive thermal trauma. Beginning immediately post-burn, during the ebb phase, cardiac function is severely depressed. By 48 h post-injury, cardiac function rebounds and the post-burn myocardium becomes tachycardic and hyperinflammatory. While current clinical trials are investigating a variety of drugs targeted at reducing aspects of the post-burn hypermetabolic response such as heart rate and cardiac work, there is still a paucity of knowledge regarding the underlying mechanisms that induce cardiac dysfunction in the severely burned. There are many animal models of burn injury, from rodents, to sheep or swine, but the majority of burn related cardiovascular investigations have occurred in rat and mouse models. This literature review consolidates the data supporting the prevalent role that β-adrenergic receptors play in mediating post-burn cardiac dysfunction and the idea that pharmacological modulation of this receptor family is a viable therapeutic target for resolving burn-induced cardiac deficits. View Full-Text
Keywords: burns; thermal injury; cardiac dysfunction; animal models burns; thermal injury; cardiac dysfunction; animal models
Figures

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Guillory, A.N.; Clayton, R.P.; Herndon, D.N.; Finnerty, C.C. Cardiovascular Dysfunction Following Burn Injury: What We Have Learned from Rat and Mouse Models. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17, 53.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Mol. Sci. EISSN 1422-0067 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top