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Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2015, 16(12), 28377-28385; doi:10.3390/ijms161226102

Myricetin Attenuates Depressant-Like Behavior in Mice Subjected to Repeated Restraint Stress

Department of Physiology, Medical College of Qingdao University, Shandong Provincial Collaborative Innovation Center for Neurodegenerative Disorders, Qingdao 266071, China
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Katalin Prokai-Tatrai
Received: 15 October 2015 / Revised: 18 November 2015 / Accepted: 20 November 2015 / Published: 30 November 2015
(This article belongs to the Collection Neuroprotective Strategies)
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Abstract

Increasing evidence has shown that oxidative stress may be implicated in chronic stress-induced depression. Several flavonoids with anti-oxidative effects have been proved to be anti-depressive. Myricetin is a well-defined flavonoid with the anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, and neuroprotective properties. The aim of the present study is to investigate the possible effects of chronic administration of myricetin on depressant-like behaviors in mice subjected to repeated restraint (4 h/day) for 21 days. Our results showed that myricetin administration specifically reduced the immobility time in mice exposed to chronic stress, as tested in both forced swimming test and tail suspension test. Myricetin treatment improved activities of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) in the hippocampus of stressed mice. In addition, myricetin treatment decreased plasma corticosterone levels of those mice subjected to repeated restraint stress. The effects of myricetin on the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in hippocampus were also investigated. The results revealed that myricetin normalized the decreased BDNF levels in mice subjected to repeated restraint stress. These findings provided more evidence that chronic administration of myricetin improves helpless behaviors. The protective effects of myricetin might be partially mediated by an influence on BDNF levels and might be attributed to myricetin-mediated anti-oxidative stress in the hippocampus. View Full-Text
Keywords: chronic stress; myricetin; depression; anti-oxidation; brain-derived neurotrophic factor chronic stress; myricetin; depression; anti-oxidation; brain-derived neurotrophic factor
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Ma, Z.; Wang, G.; Cui, L.; Wang, Q. Myricetin Attenuates Depressant-Like Behavior in Mice Subjected to Repeated Restraint Stress. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2015, 16, 28377-28385.

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