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Molecules 2016, 21(3), 386; doi:10.3390/molecules21030386

A Solvent-Free Surface Suspension Melt Technique for Making Biodegradable PCL Membrane Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering Applications

1
Singapore Centre for 3D Printing, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Block N3.1, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798, Singapore
2
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Block N4.1, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798, Singapore
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Derek J. McPhee
Received: 16 January 2016 / Revised: 16 March 2016 / Accepted: 17 March 2016 / Published: 21 March 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomaterials and Bioprinting)
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Abstract

In tissue engineering, there is limited availability of a simple, fast and solvent-free process for fabricating micro-porous thin membrane scaffolds. This paper presents the first report of a novel surface suspension melt technique to fabricate a micro-porous thin membrane scaffolds without using any organic solvent. Briefly, a layer of polycaprolactone (PCL) particles is directly spread on top of water in the form of a suspension. After that, with the use of heat, the powder layer is transformed into a melted layer, and following cooling, a thin membrane is obtained. Two different sizes of PCL powder particles (100 µm and 500 µm) are used. Results show that membranes made from 100 µm powders have lower thickness, smaller pore size, smoother surface, higher value of stiffness but lower ultimate tensile load compared to membranes made from 500 µm powder. C2C12 cell culture results indicate that the membrane supports cell growth and differentiation. Thus, this novel membrane generation method holds great promise for tissue engineering. View Full-Text
Keywords: biodegradable polymers; polycaprolactone; polymer membranes; tissue engineering biodegradable polymers; polycaprolactone; polymer membranes; tissue engineering
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Suntornnond, R.; An, J.; Tijore, A.; Leong, K.F.; Chua, C.K.; Tan, L.P. A Solvent-Free Surface Suspension Melt Technique for Making Biodegradable PCL Membrane Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering Applications. Molecules 2016, 21, 386.

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