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J. Fungi 2016, 2(2), 18; doi:10.3390/jof2020018

Chronic Pulmonary Aspergillosis—Where Are We? and Where Are We Going?

1
The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL, UK
2
Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, 46 Grafton Street, Manchester M13 9NT, UK
3
National Aspergillosis Centre, 2nd Floor Education and Research Centre, University Hospital of South Manchester, Southmoor Road, Manchester M23 9LT, UK
4
The University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, 2nd Floor Education and Research Centre, University Hospital of South Manchester, Southmoor Road, Manchester M23 9LT, UK
5
Mycology Reference Centre, Manchester, 2nd Floor Education and Research Centre, University Hospital of South Manchester, Southmoor Road, Manchester M23 9LT, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: William J. Steinbach
Received: 20 March 2016 / Revised: 19 May 2016 / Accepted: 1 June 2016 / Published: 7 June 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aspergillus fumigatus: From Diagnosis to Therapy)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [8564 KB, uploaded 7 June 2016]   |  

Abstract

Chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (CPA) is estimated to affect 3 million people worldwide making it an under recognised, but significant health problem across the globe, conferring significant morbidity and mortality. With variable disease forms, high levels of associated respiratory co-morbidity, limited therapeutic options and prolonged treatment strategies, CPA is a challenging disease for both patients and healthcare professionals. CPA can mimic smear-negative tuberculosis (TB), pulmonary histoplasmosis or coccidioidomycosis. Cultures for Aspergillus are usually negative, however, the detection of Aspergillus IgG is a simple and sensitive test widely used in diagnosis. When a fungal ball/aspergilloma is visible radiologically, the diagnosis has been made late. Sometimes weight loss and fatigue are predominant symptoms; pyrexia is rare. Despite the efforts of the mycology community, and significant strides being taken in optimising the care of these patients, much remains to be learnt about this patient population, the disease itself and the best use of available therapies, with the development of new therapies being a key priority. Here, current knowledge and practices are reviewed, and areas of research priority highlighted. View Full-Text
Keywords: chronic pulmonary aspergillosis; chronic cavitary pulmonary aspergillosis; chronic fibrosing pulmonary aspergillosis; subacute invasive aspergillosis; aspergilloma; Aspergillus nodule; Aspergillus chronic pulmonary aspergillosis; chronic cavitary pulmonary aspergillosis; chronic fibrosing pulmonary aspergillosis; subacute invasive aspergillosis; aspergilloma; Aspergillus nodule; Aspergillus
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Hayes, G.E.; Novak-Frazer, L. Chronic Pulmonary Aspergillosis—Where Are We? and Where Are We Going? J. Fungi 2016, 2, 18.

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