Next Article in Journal
Risk Factor Assessment of Hospice Patients Readmitted within 7 Days of Acute Care Hospital Discharge
Next Article in Special Issue
Risk of Cardiovascular Diseases and Cancer in Later Life: The Role of Age at First Marriage
Previous Article in Journal
Acknowledgement to Reviewers of Geriatrics in 2017
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Geriatrics 2018, 3(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics3010003

Successful Aging: Illness and Social Connections

1
Department of Sociology, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6, Canada
2
Department of Medicine, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 12 December 2017 / Revised: 24 December 2017 / Accepted: 15 January 2018 / Published: 18 January 2018
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [207 KB, uploaded 18 January 2018]

Abstract

The objective of this study was to examine the role of social determinants of health: gender, income, education, housing, and social connections in successful aging in older adults aging with illness. Participants were 50 adults aged 65–90 years, all aging in place in their own home, and reporting at least one illness. This pilot study used non-probability sampling and employed both online and in-person interviews. The majority (82%) were aging “successfully” or “somewhat successfully” as reported on the single item successful aging scale and demonstrated by their scores on the Successful Aging Inventory (SAI). Correlations were not significant between SAI and gender, income, education, or housing. A significant negative correlation was found between SAI and community activity. However, there were significant positive correlations between SAI and religious activity and relationships. The regression model was a linear combination of participants’ community and religious activity and relationships. The majority of older adults aging with illness consider themselves to be aging successfully, but their scores are influenced by relationships with others as well as religious and community activity. Frequent community activity had a suppressor effect on successful aging. View Full-Text
Keywords: aging; geriatric health; successful aging; resilience; determinants of health; social connectedness aging; geriatric health; successful aging; resilience; determinants of health; social connectedness
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Carver, L.F.; Beamish, R.; Phillips, S.P. Successful Aging: Illness and Social Connections. Geriatrics 2018, 3, 3.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Geriatrics EISSN 2308-3417 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top