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Geriatrics 2016, 1(3), 15; doi:10.3390/geriatrics1030015

Capturing Interactive Occupation and Social Engagement in a Residential Dementia and Mental Health Setting Using Quantitative and Narrative Data

1
Occupational Therapy Department, Mental Health Services, Cavan General Hospital, Lisdarn, Cavan H12 N889, Ireland
2
Discipline of Occupational Therapy, Trinity College, Saint James’s Hospital, James’s Street, Dublin D08 RT2X, Ireland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Ralf Lobmann
Received: 5 April 2016 / Revised: 8 June 2016 / Accepted: 22 June 2016 / Published: 28 June 2016
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Abstract

Objectives: Despite an abundance of research acknowledging the value of interactive occupation and social engagement for older people, and the limits to these imposed by many residential settings, there is a lack of research which measures and analyzes these concepts. This research provides a method for measuring, analysing and monitoring interactive occupation and social engagement levels of residents in a secure residential setting for older people with mental health problems and dementia. It proposes suggestions for changes to improve the well-being of residents in residential settings. Method: In this case study design, the Assessment Tool for Occupational and Social Engagement (ATOSE) provided a ‘whole room’ time sampling technique to observe resident and staff interactive occupation and social engagement within the communal sitting room over a five-week period. Researchers made contemporaneous notes to supplement the ATOSE data and to contextualise the observations. Results: Residents in the sitting room were passive, sedentary, and unengaged for 82.73% of their time. Staff, who were busy and active 98.84% of their time in the sitting room, spent 43.39% of this time in activities which did not directly engage the residents. The physical, social and occupational environments did not support interactive occupation or social engagement. Conclusions: The ATOSE assessment tool, in combination with narrative data, provides a clear measurement and analysis of interactive occupation and social engagement in this and other residential settings. Suggestions for change include a focus on the physical, social, occupational, and sensory environments and the culture of care throughout the organization. View Full-Text
Keywords: social engagement; interactive occupation; elderly; mental health; dementia; residents; staff; residential; nursing home; environment social engagement; interactive occupation; elderly; mental health; dementia; residents; staff; residential; nursing home; environment
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Morgan-Brown, M.; Brangan, J. Capturing Interactive Occupation and Social Engagement in a Residential Dementia and Mental Health Setting Using Quantitative and Narrative Data. Geriatrics 2016, 1, 15.

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