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Medicines 2017, 4(1), 2; doi:10.3390/medicines4010002

Qigong in Cancer Care: Theory, Evidence-Base, and Practice

Physical Therapy Program, D’Youville College, 361 Niagara St, Buffalo, NY 14201, USA
Academic Editor: Wen Liu
Received: 28 October 2016 / Revised: 24 December 2016 / Accepted: 30 December 2016 / Published: 12 January 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Qigong Exercise)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [258 KB, uploaded 12 January 2017]

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this discussion is to explore the theory, evidence base, and practice of Qigong for individuals with cancer. Questions addressed are: What is qigong? How does it work? What evidence exists supporting its practice in integrative oncology? What barriers to wide-spread programming access exist? Methods: Sources for this discussion include a review of scholarly texts, the Internet, PubMed, field observations, and expert opinion. Results: Qigong is a gentle, mind/body exercise integral within Chinese medicine. Theoretical foundations include Chinese medicine energy theory, psychoneuroimmunology, the relaxation response, the meditation effect, and epigenetics. Research supports positive effects on quality of life (QOL), fatigue, immune function and cortisol levels, and cognition for individuals with cancer. There is indirect, scientific evidence suggesting that qigong practice may positively influence cancer prevention and survival. No one Qigong exercise regimen has been established as superior. Effective protocols do have common elements: slow mindful exercise, easy to learn, breath regulation, meditation, emphasis on relaxation, and energy cultivation including mental intent and self-massage. Conclusions: Regular practice of Qigong exercise therapy has the potential to improve cancer-related QOL and is indirectly linked to cancer prevention and survival. Wide-spread access to quality Qigong in cancer care programming may be challenged by the availability of existing programming and work force capacity. View Full-Text
Keywords: cancer; Qigong; Tai chi; review cancer; Qigong; Tai chi; review
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Klein, P. Qigong in Cancer Care: Theory, Evidence-Base, and Practice. Medicines 2017, 4, 2.

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