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Children 2018, 5(2), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/children5020030

The Sitting-Height Index of Build, (Body Mass)/(Sitting Height)3, as an Improvement on the Body Mass Index for Children, Adolescents and Young Adults

School of Life Sciences, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK
Received: 21 December 2017 / Revised: 29 January 2018 / Accepted: 14 February 2018 / Published: 22 February 2018
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Abstract

The body mass index (BMI) is unsatisfactory in being affected by both relative leg length and height, and, for use with children and adolescents, therefore needs to be interpreted in relation to age. The sitting-height index of build (body mass)/(sitting height)3, is largely free of these disadvantages. Furthermore, because that index is independent of relative leg length, the latter can be treated as a separate indicator of nutritional history and health risks. Past studies on white children and adults have shown body mass to be approximately proportional to (sitting height)3. Moreover, multiple regression of (body mass)1/3 on sitting height and leg length, using year-by-year averages, has indicated that leg length is an insignificant predictor of body mass. The present study used data for individuals, namely 2–20 years old males and females, black as well as white. Regression analysis as above again showed leg length to be an insignificant predictor of body mass, but only above the age of about nine years. However, sitting height is still a stronger predictor of body mass than leg length at all ages. The advantages of the sitting-height index of build for use with young people are confirmed. View Full-Text
Keywords: sitting height; leg length; sitting-height index of build; body mass index; BMI; Cormic index; adiposity rebound sitting height; leg length; sitting-height index of build; body mass index; BMI; Cormic index; adiposity rebound
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Burton, R. The Sitting-Height Index of Build, (Body Mass)/(Sitting Height)3, as an Improvement on the Body Mass Index for Children, Adolescents and Young Adults. Children 2018, 5, 30.

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