Next Article in Journal
Acute Diarrhoea in Children: Determination of Duration Using a Combined Bismuth Hydroxide Gel and Oral Rehydration Solution Therapy vs. Oral Rehydration Solution
Next Article in Special Issue
Parent and Child Report of Pain and Fatigue in JIA: Does Disagreement between Parent and Child Predict Functional Outcomes?
Previous Article in Journal / Special Issue
Chronic Pain in Children and Adolescents: Diagnosis and Treatment of Primary Pain Disorders in Head, Abdomen, Muscles and Joints
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessReview
Children 2016, 3(4), 43; doi:10.3390/children3040043

Pain Neuroscience Education: State of the Art and Application in Pediatrics

1
Division of Pain Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital, MA 02115, USA
2
Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1070 Arastradero Road, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Carl L. von Baeyer
Received: 19 August 2016 / Revised: 6 December 2016 / Accepted: 12 December 2016 / Published: 21 December 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chronic and Recurrent Pain)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [3015 KB, uploaded 21 December 2016]   |  

Abstract

Chronic pain is a widespread problem in the field of pediatrics. Many interventions to ameliorate pain-related dysfunction have a biobehavioral focus. As treatments for chronic pain (e.g., increased movement) often stand in stark contrast to treatments for an acute injury (e.g., rest), providing a solid rationale for treatment is necessary to gain patient and parent buy-in. Most pain treatment interventions incorporate psychoeducation, or pain neuroscience education (PNE), as an essential component, and in some cases, as a stand-alone approach. The current topical review focuses on the state of pain neuroscience education and its application to pediatric chronic pain. As very little research has examined pain neuroscience education in pediatrics, we aim to describe this emerging area and catalyze further work on this important topic. As the present literature has generally focused on adults with chronic pain, pain neuroscience education merits further attention in the realm of pediatric pain in order to be tailored and implemented in this population. View Full-Text
Keywords: pain neuroscience education; psychoeducation; cognitive intervention; biopsychosocial model; pediatric chronic pain pain neuroscience education; psychoeducation; cognitive intervention; biopsychosocial model; pediatric chronic pain
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Robins, H.; Perron, V.; Heathcote, L.C.; Simons, L.E. Pain Neuroscience Education: State of the Art and Application in Pediatrics. Children 2016, 3, 43.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Children EISSN 2227-9067 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top