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Children 2016, 3(4), 39; doi:10.3390/children3040039

Pain in School: Patterns of Pain-Related School Impairment among Adolescents with Primary Pain Conditions, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Pain, and Pain-Free Peers

1
Division of Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Department of Anesthesia, Boston Children’s Hospital, Pain Treatment Service, 333 Longwood Ave., Boston, MA 02115, USA
2
Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
3
Division of Anesthesiology, Sedation and Perioperative Medicine, Children’s National Health System, Washington, DC 20010, USA
4
The George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC 20037, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Carl L. von Baeyer
Received: 16 September 2016 / Revised: 19 November 2016 / Accepted: 21 November 2016 / Published: 30 November 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chronic and Recurrent Pain)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [790 KB, uploaded 30 November 2016]   |  

Abstract

Children with chronic pain frequently experience impairment in the school setting, but we do not yet understand how unique these struggles are to children with primary pain conditions compared to peers with disease-related pain or those without chronic pain symptoms. The objective of this study is to examine school functioning, defined as school attendance rates, overall quality of life in the school setting, and school nurse visits among adolescents with primary pain conditions, those with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-related pain, and healthy peers. Two hundred and sixty adolescents participated in the study, including 129 with primary pain conditions, 61 with JIA, and 70 healthy comparison adolescents. They completed self- and parent-reported measures of school function. Findings show that as a group, youth with primary pain conditions reported more school absences, lower quality of life in the school setting, and more frequent school nurse visits compared to both adolescents with JIA-related pain and healthy peers. We conclude that compared to those who experience pain specific to a disease process, adolescents with primary pain conditions may face unique challenges in the school setting and may require more support to help them succeed in school in spite of pain. View Full-Text
Keywords: chronic pain; child and adolescent; school functioning chronic pain; child and adolescent; school functioning
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MDPI and ACS Style

Agoston, A.M.; Gray, L.S.; Logan, D.E. Pain in School: Patterns of Pain-Related School Impairment among Adolescents with Primary Pain Conditions, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Pain, and Pain-Free Peers. Children 2016, 3, 39.

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