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Children 2014, 1(3), 339-354; doi:10.3390/children1030339

Teenagers and Playing: Are Pastimes Like Neknominate a Usual Response to Adolescence?

1,2,†
1
Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield S1 1WB, U.K
2
International Play Association—England, Wales and Northern Ireland (IPA-EWNI), c/o 70 Kilmorie Rd, Forest Hill, London SE23 2ST, U.K.
Sadly, Dr. Perry Else passed away on 1 June 2014 soon after submitting this article. It stands as a tribute to his work, passion and dedication that he managed to complete it whilst very ill.
Received: 29 May 2014 / Revised: 22 September 2014 / Accepted: 22 September 2014 / Published: 22 October 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Play in Children’s Health and Development)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [260 KB, uploaded 22 October 2014]   |  

Abstract

While “outside of society” for much of the last sixty years, adolescents have attracted attention in recent times because of perceptions of their anti-social and, in some cases, violent behaviour. Teenagers face many challenges on their journey to adulthood; growth spurts, hormone developments and changes in the structure of the brain. These biological challenges have been affected since around 1990 by the impact of technology and the subsequent cultural changes. Activities, like the technology-driven, socially-networked pastime, Neknomination, amongst others, meet basic drives that gym-based activities do not. Adults are increasingly concerned about unhealthy patterns of behaviour that suggest that this coming generation of adults will not live as long as their parents, causing misery and putting additional economic pressures on families and society if the expected standards of living and health are to be maintained. The pressures facing teenagers are many, but a concerted effort by adults to change their attitudes towards children and young people to help rather than instruct may assist with meeting their needs and those of society. View Full-Text
Keywords: benefits of play; play; risk; children and young people’s health; obesity; teenagers; adolescence; integral play framework; brain growth; culture; not-play; play deprivation; technology and play benefits of play; play; risk; children and young people’s health; obesity; teenagers; adolescence; integral play framework; brain growth; culture; not-play; play deprivation; technology and play
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Else, P. Teenagers and Playing: Are Pastimes Like Neknominate a Usual Response to Adolescence? Children 2014, 1, 339-354.

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