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Children 2014, 1(3), 280-301; doi:10.3390/children1030280

Seeking Balance in Motion: The Role of Spontaneous Free Play in Promoting Social and Emotional Health in Early Childhood Care and Education

Early Learning and Child Care, Faculty of Health and Community Studies, MacEwan University, Edmonton AB T5J4P2, Canada
Received: 14 August 2014 / Revised: 17 September 2014 / Accepted: 18 September 2014 / Published: 1 October 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Play in Children’s Health and Development)
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Abstract

There is accumulating scientific evidence of the potential of play and playfulness to enhance human capacity to respond to adversity and cope with the stresses of everyday life. In play we build a repertoire of adaptive, flexible responses to unexpected events, in an environment separated from the real consequences of those events. Playfulness helps us maintain social and emotional equilibrium in times of rapid change and stress. Through play, we experience flow—A feeling of being taken to another place, out of time, where we have controlled of the world. This paper argues that spontaneous free play, controlled and directed by children and understood from the child’s perspective, contributes to children’s subjective experience of well-being, building a foundation for life-long social and emotional health. The paradoxical nature of young children’s spontaneous free play is explored. Adaptability, control, flexibility, resilience and balance result from the experience of uncertainty, unpredictability, novelty and non-productivity. These essential dimensions of young children’s spontaneous free play typically produce play which is experienced by adults as chaotic, nonsensical and disruptive. The article concludes with a preliminary discussion of the challenges and possibilities of providing for spontaneous free play indoors, in early childhood care and education programs. View Full-Text
Keywords: spontaneous free play; playfulness; social and emotional health; early childhood care and education; rough and tumble play; dizzy play spontaneous free play; playfulness; social and emotional health; early childhood care and education; rough and tumble play; dizzy play
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Hewes, J. Seeking Balance in Motion: The Role of Spontaneous Free Play in Promoting Social and Emotional Health in Early Childhood Care and Education. Children 2014, 1, 280-301.

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