Next Article in Journal
Neuropsychiatric Lyme Borreliosis: An Overview with a Focus on a Specialty Psychiatrist’s Clinical Practice
Previous Article in Journal
PTSD in U.S. Veterans: The Role of Social Connectedness, Combat Experience and Discharge
Previous Article in Special Issue
Fecal Distribution Changes Using Colorectal Ultrasonography in Older People with Physical and Cognitive Impairment Living in Long-Term Care Facilities: A Longitudinal Observational Study
Article Menu
Issue 3 (September) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Healthcare 2018, 6(3), 103; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare6030103

Signs in People with Intellectual Disabilities: Interviews with Managers and Staff on the Identification Process of Dementia

1
The Swedish Red Cross University College, Box 1059, SE-141 21 Stockholm, Sweden
2
Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Box 157, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 4 August 2018 / Revised: 20 August 2018 / Accepted: 23 August 2018 / Published: 25 August 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Care of People Living with Dementia)
Full-Text   |   PDF [563 KB, uploaded 29 August 2018]   |  

Abstract

The life expectancy of people with intellectual disabilities (ID) has steadily increased, which has been accompanied by an increased risk of dementia. Staff and managers are key resources for safety diagnosis since they deliver information about people with ID behavior every day. The aim of the present study was to explore the identification process employed by staff and managers to detect signs of suspected dementia in people with an ID within intellectual disability services (ID-services). Twenty managers and 24 staff within an ID-service were interviewed and qualitative latent content analysis was applied. A model consisting of three themes on three levels of resources for the identification process of signs of suspected dementia emerged from the analysis. On the first level was the time and continuity in the care relationship, which is crucial for identifying and responding to changes in cognitive ability that indicate dementia. On the second level, the staff identify deficiencies in their own knowledge, seek support from colleagues and managers within their workplace and, on the third level, outside their workplace. Staff and managers expressed a need for early and continuous guidance and education from specialists in dementia and primary healthcare. This finding indicates an urgent need for intervention research and digital support for staff in dementia care. View Full-Text
Keywords: intellectual disability; mental retardation; learning disability; older people; dementia; signs of dementia; frailty; qualitative study; interview study; caregivers’ experiences intellectual disability; mental retardation; learning disability; older people; dementia; signs of dementia; frailty; qualitative study; interview study; caregivers’ experiences
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Holst, G.; Johansson, M.; Ahlström, G. Signs in People with Intellectual Disabilities: Interviews with Managers and Staff on the Identification Process of Dementia. Healthcare 2018, 6, 103.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Healthcare EISSN 2227-9032 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top