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Healthcare 2018, 6(2), 48; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare6020048

Transitioning from Acute to Chronic Pain: An Examination of Different Trajectories of Low-Back Pain

1
Department of Psychology, College of Science, The University of Texas at Arlington, 1225 West Mitchell, Box 19528, Arlington, TX 76019, USA
2
University of North Texas Health Sciences Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107, USA
3
Department of Mathematics, College of Science, The University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019, USA
4
College of Nursing and Health Innovations, The University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76010, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 18 April 2018 / Revised: 11 May 2018 / Accepted: 15 May 2018 / Published: 17 May 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chronic Pain and the Aging Population)
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Abstract

Traditionally, there has been a widely accepted notion that the transition from acute to chronic pain follows a linear trajectory, where an injury leads to acute episodes, subacute stages, and progresses to a chronic pain condition. However, it appears that pain progression is much more complicated and individualized than this original unsupported assumption. It is now becoming apparent that, while this linear progression may occur, it is not the only path that pain, specifically low-back pain, follows. It is clear there is a definite need to evaluate how low-back pain trajectories are classified and, subsequently, how we can more effectively intervene during these progression stages. In order to better understand and manage pain conditions, we must examine the different pain trajectories, and develop a standard by which to use these classifications, so that clinicians can better identify and predict patient-needs and customize treatments for maximum efficacy. The present article examines the most recent trajectory research, and highlights the importance of developing a broader model for patient evaluation. View Full-Text
Keywords: pain; low-back pain; chronic; acute; subacute; pain trajectories pain; low-back pain; chronic; acute; subacute; pain trajectories
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Gatchel, R.J.; Bevers, K.; Licciardone, J.C.; Su, J.; Du, Y.; Brotto, M. Transitioning from Acute to Chronic Pain: An Examination of Different Trajectories of Low-Back Pain. Healthcare 2018, 6, 48.

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