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Healthcare 2017, 5(3), 49; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare5030049

Breakfast Cereal Consumption and Obesity Risk amongst the Mid-Age Cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health

1
Discipline of Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Health Sciences, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
2
Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
3
Centre for Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics, School of Medicine and Public Health, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
4
Hunter Medical Research Institute, New Lambton, NSW 2305, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Sampath Parthasarathy
Received: 26 July 2017 / Revised: 16 August 2017 / Accepted: 25 August 2017 / Published: 30 August 2017
Full-Text   |   PDF [233 KB, uploaded 30 August 2017]

Abstract

Obesity affects 27.5% of Australian women. Breakfast cereal consumption has been proposed to be protective against obesity. This study investigated the association of breakfast cereal consumption with the risk of developing obesity (Body Mass Index (BMI) ≥ 30 kg/m2) over 12 years among mid-age participants in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health (ALSWH). Dietary data were obtained at S3 and obesity incidence at S4–S7. Women were excluded if: dietary data were incomplete, energy intake was <4500 or >20,000 kJ/day, or they reported being overweight or obese at S3. Logistic regressions with discrete time survival analysis investigated the association between breakfast cereal intake and incident obesity and were adjusted for: area of residency, income, smoking, physical activity, hypertension, dietary intakes and a discrete measure of time. There were 308 incident cases of obesity. Any breakfast cereal intake was not associated with incident obesity (Odds Ratio (OR): 0.92; p = 0.68). Oat-based cereal (OR: 0.71; p = 0.01), muesli (OR: 0.57; p = 0.00) and All-Bran (OR: 0.62; p = 0.01) intakes were associated with a significant reduction in obesity risk. Among this cohort, muesli on its own, or as part of oat-based cereals, and All-Bran, were associated with a reduction in obesity. This effect may be due to particular characteristics of these cereal eaters, but the relationship warrants further investigation. View Full-Text
Keywords: obesity; muesli; porridge; breakfast cereal; ready-to-eat cereal obesity; muesli; porridge; breakfast cereal; ready-to-eat cereal
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Quatela, A.; Callister, R.; Patterson, A.J.; McEvoy, M.; MacDonald-Wicks, L.K. Breakfast Cereal Consumption and Obesity Risk amongst the Mid-Age Cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health. Healthcare 2017, 5, 49.

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