Next Article in Journal
Addressing Younger Workers’ Needs: The Promoting U through Safety and Health (PUSH) Trial Outcomes
Next Article in Special Issue
The Relationship between Pain Beliefs and Physical and Mental Health Outcome Measures in Chronic Low Back Pain: Direct and Indirect Effects
Previous Article in Journal
The Development of a Mindfulness-Based Music Therapy (MBMT) Program for Women Receiving Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer
Previous Article in Special Issue
Treatment of Lower Back Pain—The Gap between Guideline-Based Treatment and Medical Care Reality
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Healthcare 2016, 4(3), 54; doi:10.3390/healthcare4030054

Enhanced Brain Responses to Pain-Related Words in Chronic Back Pain Patients and Their Modulation by Current Pain

1
Department of Biological and Clinical Psychology, Friedrich Schiller University of Jena, Am Steiger 3, Haus 1, Jena D-07743, Germany
2
Section of Neurological Rehabilitation, Hans–Berger Department of Neurology at Jena University Hospital, Erlanger Allee 101, Jena D-07747, Germany
3
Department of Sports Medicine and Health Promotion, Friedrich Schiller University of Jena, Wöllnitzer Str. 42, Jena D-07749, Germany
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Robert J. Gatchel
Received: 14 April 2016 / Revised: 15 July 2016 / Accepted: 1 August 2016 / Published: 10 August 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Low Back Pain: Recent Advances And Perspectives)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1498 KB, uploaded 10 August 2016]   |  

Abstract

Previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies in healthy controls (HC) and pain-free migraine patients found activations to pain-related words in brain regions known to be activated while subjects experience pain. The aim of the present study was to identify neural activations induced by pain-related words in a sample of chronic back pain (CBP) patients experiencing current chronic pain compared to HC. In particular, we were interested in how current pain influences brain activations induced by pain-related adjectives. Subjects viewed pain-related, negative, positive, and neutral words; subjects were asked to generate mental images related to these words during fMRI scanning. Brain activation was compared between CBP patients and HC in response to the different word categories and examined in relation to current pain in CBP patients. Pain-related words vs. neutral words activated a network of brain regions including cingulate cortex and insula in subjects and patients. There was stronger activation in medial and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and anterior midcingulate cortex in CPB patients than in HC. The magnitude of activation for pain-related vs. negative words showed a negative linear relationship to CBP patients’ current pain. Our findings confirm earlier observations showing that pain-related words activate brain networks similar to noxious stimulation. Importantly, CBP patients show even stronger activation of these structures while merely processing pain-related words. Current pain directly influences on this activation. View Full-Text
Keywords: chronic back pain; semantic processing; current pain; fMRI chronic back pain; semantic processing; current pain; fMRI
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Ritter, A.; Franz, M.; Puta, C.; Dietrich, C.; Miltner, W.H.R.; Weiss, T. Enhanced Brain Responses to Pain-Related Words in Chronic Back Pain Patients and Their Modulation by Current Pain. Healthcare 2016, 4, 54.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Healthcare EISSN 2227-9032 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top