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Educ. Sci. 2015, 5(2), 146-165; doi:10.3390/educsci5020146

Undergraduate Research Involving Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students in Interdisciplinary Science Projects

1
Department of Science and Mathematics/Laboratory Science Technology Program, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623, USA
2
Thomas H. Gosnell School of Life Sciences, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: John Blewitt
Received: 30 March 2015 / Revised: 6 May 2015 / Accepted: 13 May 2015 / Published: 21 May 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Global Perspectives on Higher Education)
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Abstract

Scientific undergraduate research in higher education often yields positive outcomes for student and faculty member participants alike, with underrepresented students often showing even more substantial gains (academic, professional, and personal) as a result of the experience. Significant success can be realized when involving deaf and hard-of-hearing (d/hh) undergraduate students, who are also vastly underrepresented in the sciences, in interdisciplinary research projects. Even d/hh Associate degree level students and those in the first two years of their postsecondary careers can contribute to, and benefit from, the research process when faculty mentors properly plan/design projects. We discuss strategies, including the dissemination/communication of research results, for involving these students in research groups with different communication dynamics and share both findings of our research program and examples of successful chemical and biological research projects that have involved d/hh undergraduate students. We hope to stimulate a renewed interest in encouraging diversity and involving students with disabilities into higher education research experiences globally and across multiple scientific disciplines, thus strengthening the education and career pipeline of these students. View Full-Text
Keywords: undergraduate research; underrepresented students; students with disabilities; deaf and hard-of-hearing; Associate degree level; early undergraduates; chemical and biological sciences undergraduate research; underrepresented students; students with disabilities; deaf and hard-of-hearing; Associate degree level; early undergraduates; chemical and biological sciences
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Pagano, T.; Ross, A.; Smith, S.B. Undergraduate Research Involving Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students in Interdisciplinary Science Projects. Educ. Sci. 2015, 5, 146-165.

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