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Pharmacy 2018, 6(2), 41; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy6020041

Simulation and Feedback in Health Education: A Mixed Methods Study Comparing Three Simulation Modalities

1
Pharmacy Department, Townsville Hospital, Douglas 4814, Australia
2
Division of Pharmacy, University of Western Australia, Perth 6009, Australia
3
Western Australian Centre for Rural Health, University of Western Australia, Geraldton 6530, Australia
4
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, University of Newcastle, Newcastle 2308, Australia
5
Department of Pharmacy, University of Tasmania, Hobart 7001, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 27 March 2018 / Revised: 17 April 2018 / Accepted: 23 April 2018 / Published: 3 May 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Simulation in Pharmacy Education and Beyond)
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Abstract

Background. There are numerous approaches to simulating a patient encounter in pharmacy education. However, little direct comparison between these approaches has been undertaken. Our objective was to investigate student experiences, satisfaction, and feedback preferences between three scenario simulation modalities (paper-, actor-, and computer-based). Methods. We conducted a mixed methods study with randomized cross-over of simulation modalities on final-year Australian graduate-entry Master of Pharmacy students. Participants completed case-based scenarios within each of three simulation modalities, with feedback provided at the completion of each scenario in a format corresponding to each simulation modality. A post-simulation questionnaire collected qualitative and quantitative responses pertaining to participant satisfaction, experiences, and feedback preferences. Results. Participants reported similar levels satisfaction across all three modalities. However, each modality resulted in unique positive and negative experiences, such as student disengagement with paper-based scenarios. Conclusion. Importantly, the themes of guidance and opportunity for peer discussion underlie the best forms of feedback for students. The provision of feedback following simulation should be carefully considered and delivered, with all three simulation modalities producing both positive and negative experiences in regard to their feedback format. View Full-Text
Keywords: pharmacy education; simulation; scenarios; computer; virtual; virtual patient; standardized patient; actor; paper-based pharmacy education; simulation; scenarios; computer; virtual; virtual patient; standardized patient; actor; paper-based
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Tait, L.; Lee, K.; Rasiah, R.; Cooper, J.M.; Ling, T.; Geelan, B.; Bindoff, I. Simulation and Feedback in Health Education: A Mixed Methods Study Comparing Three Simulation Modalities. Pharmacy 2018, 6, 41.

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