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Pharmacy 2015, 3(4), 182-196; doi:10.3390/pharmacy3040182

Self-Reported Digital Literacy of the Pharmacy Workforce in North East Scotland

School of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen AB10 7GJ, UK
These authors contributed equally to this work.
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Keith A. Wilson
Received: 11 August 2015 / Revised: 17 September 2015 / Accepted: 30 September 2015 / Published: 15 October 2015
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Abstract

In their day-to-day practice, pharmacists, graduate (pre-registration) pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, dispensing assistants and medicines counter assistants use widely available office, retail and management information systems alongside dedicated pharmacy management and electronic health (ehealth) applications. The ability of pharmacy staff to use these applications at home and at work, also known as digital literacy or digital competence or e-skills, depends on personal experience and related education and training. The aim of this research was to gain insight into the self-reported digital literacy of the pharmacy workforce in the North East of Scotland. A purposive case sample survey was conducted across NHS Grampian in the NE of Scotland. Data collection was based on five items: sex, age band, role, pharmacy experience plus a final question about self-reported digital literacy. The study was conducted between August 2012 and March 2013 in 17 community and two hospital pharmacies. With few exceptions, pharmacy staff perceived their own digital literacy to be at a basic level. Secondary outcome measures of role, age, gender and work experience were not found to be clear determinants of digital literacy. Pharmacy staff need to be more digitally literate to harness technologies in pharmacy practice more effectively and efficiently. View Full-Text
Keywords: digital literacy; pharmacy workforce; pharmacy technology; ehealth; change management; Scotland digital literacy; pharmacy workforce; pharmacy technology; ehealth; change management; Scotland
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

MacLure, K.; Stewart, D. Self-Reported Digital Literacy of the Pharmacy Workforce in North East Scotland. Pharmacy 2015, 3, 182-196.

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