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Climate 2017, 5(2), 28; doi:10.3390/cli5020028

Effect of Climatic and Non-Climatic Factors on Cassava Yields in Togo: Agricultural Policy Implications

Department of Economic and Technological Change, Center for Development Research, University of Bonn, Bonn D-53113, Germany
Academic Editor: Yang Zhang
Received: 1 January 2017 / Revised: 24 March 2017 / Accepted: 27 March 2017 / Published: 29 March 2017
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Abstract

This paper examines the effects of climatic and non-climatic factors on cassava yields in Togo using an Autoregressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) modelling approach and pairwise Granger Causality tests. Secondary data on production statistics, rural population, climate variables, prices and nominal exchange rate for the period 1978–2009 are used. Results for estimated short- and long-run models indicate that cassava yield is affected by both ‘normal’ climate variables and within-season rainfall variability. An inverse relationship is found between area harvested and yield of cassava, but a significant positive and elastic effect of labour availability on yield in the long run. Increasing within-lean-season rainfall variability and high lean-season mean temperature are detrimental to cassava yields, while increasing main-season rainfall and mean-temperature enhance cassava yields. Through Granger Causality tests, a bilateral causality is found between area harvested and yield of cassava, and four unidirectional causalities from labour availability, real producer price ratio between yam and cassava, main-season rainfall and lean-season mean temperature to cassava yields. Based on the findings from this study, investment in low-cost irrigation facilities and water harvesting is recommended to enhance the practice of supplemental irrigation. Research efforts should as well be made to breed for drought, heat and flood tolerance in cassava. In addition, coupling area expansion with increasing availability of labour is advised, through the implementation of measures to minimize rural–urban migration. View Full-Text
Keywords: cassava; ‘Cassava belt’; yield response; Autoregressive Distributed Lag modelling; Granger Causality; Togo cassava; ‘Cassava belt’; yield response; Autoregressive Distributed Lag modelling; Granger Causality; Togo
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Boansi, D. Effect of Climatic and Non-Climatic Factors on Cassava Yields in Togo: Agricultural Policy Implications. Climate 2017, 5, 28.

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