Next Article in Journal
Extraction and Simplification of Building Façade Pieces from Mobile Laser Scanner Point Clouds for 3D Street View Services
Next Article in Special Issue
“Contextualized VGI” Creation and Management to Cope with Uncertainty and Imprecision
Previous Article in Journal
Describing Geospatial Assets in the Web of Data: A Metadata Management Scenario
Previous Article in Special Issue
Towards a Protocol for the Collection of VGI Vector Data
Article Menu
Issue 12 (December) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2016, 5(12), 232; doi:10.3390/ijgi5120232

Tagging in Volunteered Geographic Information: An Analysis of Tagging Practices for Cities and Urban Regions in OpenStreetMap

1
Faculty of Electronic Engineering, University of Nis, 18000 Nis, Serbia
2
Department of Computer Science, Maynooth University, W23 F2H6 Maynooth, Ireland
3
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, Como Campus, 22100 Como, Italy
Nikola Davidovic and Peter Mooney are the lead authors on this paper.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Alexander Zipf, David Jonietz, Vyron Antoniou, Linda See and Wolfgang Kainz
Received: 5 July 2016 / Revised: 8 November 2016 / Accepted: 24 November 2016 / Published: 5 December 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Volunteered Geographic Information)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1034 KB, uploaded 5 December 2016]   |  

Abstract

In Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI) projects, the tagging or annotation of objects is usually performed in a flexible and non-constrained manner. Contributors to a VGI project are normally free to choose whatever tags they feel are appropriate to annotate or describe a particular geographic object or place. In OpenStreetMap (OSM), the Map Features part of the OSM Wiki serves as the de-facto rulebook or ontology for the annotation of features in OSM. Within Map Features, suggestions and guidance on what combinations of tags to use for certain geographic objects are outlined. In this paper, we consider these suggestions and recommendations and analyse the OSM database for 40 cities around the world to ascertain if contributors to OSM in these urban areas are using this guidance in their tagging practices. Overall, we find that compliance with the suggestions and guidance in Map Features is generally average or poor. This leads us to conclude that contributors in these areas do not always tag features with the same level of annotation. Our paper also confirms anecdotal evidence that OSM Map Features is less influential in how OSM contributors tag objects. View Full-Text
Keywords: OpenStreetMap; Volunteered Geographic Information; tagging; annotation; folksonomy; ontology; metadata OpenStreetMap; Volunteered Geographic Information; tagging; annotation; folksonomy; ontology; metadata
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Davidovic, N.; Mooney, P.; Stoimenov, L.; Minghini, M. Tagging in Volunteered Geographic Information: An Analysis of Tagging Practices for Cities and Urban Regions in OpenStreetMap. ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2016, 5, 232.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. EISSN 2220-9964 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top