Next Article in Journal
Web GIS-Based Public Health Surveillance Systems: A Systematic Review
Previous Article in Journal
Mapping the Potential for Biofuel Production on Marginal Lands: Differences in Definitions, Data and Models across Scales
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2014, 3(2), 460-480; doi:10.3390/ijgi3020460

Small Reservoir Distribution, Rate of Construction, and Uses in the Upper and Middle Chattahoochee Basins of the Georgia Piedmont, USA, 1950–2010

1
Geological Survey Eastern Geographic Science Center, Reston, VA 20192, USA
2
Department of Geography, University of Georgia, 210 Field St., Athens, GA 30602, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 2 January 2014 / Revised: 3 March 2014 / Accepted: 14 March 2014 / Published: 1 April 2014
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1435 KB, uploaded 1 April 2014]   |  

Abstract

Construction of small reservoirs affects ecosystem processes in numerous ways including fragmenting stream habitat, altering hydrology, and modifying water chemistry. While the upper and middle Chattahoochee River basins within the Southeastern United States Piedmont contain few natural lakes, they have a high density of small reservoirs (more than 7500 small reservoirs in the nearly 12,000 km2 basin). Policymakers and water managers in the region have little information about small reservoir distribution, uses, or the cumulative inundation of land cover caused by small reservoir construction. Examination of aerial photography reveals the spatiotemporal patterns and extent of small reservoir construction from 1950 to 2010. Over that 60 year timeframe, the area inundated by water increased nearly six fold (from 19 reservoirs covering 0.16% of the study area in 1950 to 329 reservoirs covering 0.95% of the study area in 2010). While agricultural practices were associated with reservoir creation from 1950 to 1970, the highest rates of reservoir construction occurred during subsequent suburban development between 1980 and 1990. Land cover adjacent to individual reservoirs transitioned over time through agricultural abandonment, land reforestation, and conversion to development during suburban expansion. The prolific rate of ongoing small reservoir creation, particularly in newly urbanizing regions and developing counties, necessitates additional attention from watershed managers and continued scientific research into cumulative environmental impacts at the watershed scale. View Full-Text
Keywords: reservoir; water; land cover conversion; Geographic Information Systems; aerial photography; Chattahoochee; Piedmont; Georgia reservoir; water; land cover conversion; Geographic Information Systems; aerial photography; Chattahoochee; Piedmont; Georgia
Figures

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Ignatius, A.R.; Jones, J.W. Small Reservoir Distribution, Rate of Construction, and Uses in the Upper and Middle Chattahoochee Basins of the Georgia Piedmont, USA, 1950–2010. ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2014, 3, 460-480.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. EISSN 2220-9964 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top