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Sci. Pharm. 2011, 79(1), 145-156; doi:10.3797/scipharm.1006-06

Preparation of Herbal Tea as Infusion or by Maceration at Room Temperature Using Mistletoe Tea as an Example

1
Carl Gustav Carus-Institute, Am Eichhof 30, 75223, Niefern-Öschelbronn, Germany
2
Betulin-Institute, Blumenstr. 25, 64297, Darmstadt, Germany
3
Kneipp-Werke, Steinbachtal 43, 97082, Würzburg, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 18 June 2010 / Accepted: 30 November 2010 / Published: 30 November 2010
Download PDF [575 KB, uploaded 26 September 2016]

Abstract

Herbal tea can be prepared by infusion or maceration at room temperature resulting in different compositions of extractable constituents, which possibly influences the mode of action or safety profile. Knowledge on this topic is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the substantial differences between infusion and maceration as recommended preparation methods for the preparation of herbal mistletoe tea, a traditional remedy against cardiovascular diseases. No active substances are known but analytical marker substances such as proteins, triterpenoids, phenylpropane derivatives and flavonoids can be quantified within the herb and the different herbal tea preparations. Whereas phenylpropane derivatives were completely extracted by infusion and maceration, neither method dissolved viscotoxins. 43% of mistletoe lectins were extracted by maceration, whereas by infusion they are inactivated by thermal degradation. By contrast, oleanolic acid and betulinic acid are present in higher concentrations in infusates compared with macerates, but even infusion extracted less than 2%. Infusion extracted 43% of flavonoid-like substances and maceration only 31%. In conclusion this study determines some differences between both extraction methods on the profile of solved substances. The relevance of it should be determined in studies dealing with the efficacy of herbal mistletoe tea.
Keywords: Herbal tea; Mistletoe; Viscum album L.; Infusion; Maceration; Extraction Chromatographic profile; HPLC; GC; ELISA Herbal tea; Mistletoe; Viscum album L.; Infusion; Maceration; Extraction Chromatographic profile; HPLC; GC; ELISA
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

JÄGER, S.; BEFFERT, M.; HOPPE, K.; NADBEREZNY, D.; FRANK, B.; SCHEFFLER, A. Preparation of Herbal Tea as Infusion or by Maceration at Room Temperature Using Mistletoe Tea as an Example. Sci. Pharm. 2011, 79, 145-156.

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