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Diseases 2018, 6(1), 12; doi:10.3390/diseases6010012

Metabolic Syndrome and Chronic Renal Disease

Department of Nephrology, Doctors’ Hospital, 26 Kefallinias, 11257 Athens, Greece
Department of Weight-Surgery, Doctors’ Hospital, 11257 Athens, Greece
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 29 November 2017 / Revised: 20 January 2018 / Accepted: 22 January 2018 / Published: 24 January 2018
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Background: The influence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) on kidneys is related to many complications. We aimed to assess the association between MetS and chronic renal disease defined by a poor estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and/or the presence of microalbuminuria/macroalbuminuria. Methods: 149 patients (77 males/72 females) were enrolled in the study. Chronic renal disease was defined according to KDIGO 2012 criteria based on eGFR category and classified albuminuria. MetS was studied as a dichotomous variable (0 to 5 components) including hypertension, waist circumference, low HDL-cholesterol, high triglycerides, and high glucose. Results: The association between clustering MetS and both classified eGFR and classified albuminuria (x2 = 50.3, p = 0.001 and x2 = 26.9, p = 0.003 respectively) was found to be significant. The MetS presence showed an odds 5.3-fold (1.6–17.8) higher for low eGFR and 3.2-fold (1.2–8.8) higher for albuminuria in combination with the presence of diabetes mellitus, which also increased the risk for albuminuria by 3.5-fold (1.1–11.3). Albuminuria was significantly associated with high triglycerides, hypertension, high glucose (x2 = 11.8, p = 0.003, x2 = 11.4, p = 0.003 and x2 = 9.1, p = 0.01 respectively), and it was mildly associated with a low HDL-C (x2 = 5.7, p = 0.06). A significant association between classified eGFR and both high triglycerides and hypertension (x2 = 9.7, p = 0.04 and x2 = 16.1, p = 0.003 respectively) was found. Conclusion: The clustering of MetS was significantly associated with chronic renal disease defined by both classified eGFR and albuminuria. The definition of impaired renal function by classified albuminuria was associated with more MetS components rather than the evaluation of eGFR category. MetS may contribute to the manifestation of albuminuria in patients with diabetes mellitus. View Full-Text
Keywords: metabolic syndrome; hypertension; renal disease; albuminuria; triglycerides; eGFR metabolic syndrome; hypertension; renal disease; albuminuria; triglycerides; eGFR

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Raikou, V.D.; Gavriil, S. Metabolic Syndrome and Chronic Renal Disease. Diseases 2018, 6, 12.

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