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Biosensors 2016, 6(2), 17; doi:10.3390/bios6020017

Electronic Biosensing with Functionalized rGO FETs

1
Center for Electrochemical Surface Technology (CEST), Wiener Neustadt 2700, Austria
2
AIT Austrian Institute of Technology, Wien 1220, Austria
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Mark A. Reed and Mathias Wipf
Received: 28 February 2016 / Revised: 26 March 2016 / Accepted: 31 March 2016 / Published: 22 April 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Field-Effect Transistor Biosensors)
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Abstract

In the following we give a short summary of examples for biosensor concepts in areas in which reduced graphene oxide-based electronic devices can be developed into new classes of biosensors, which are highly sensitive, label-free, disposable and cheap, with electronic signals that are easy to analyze and interpret, suitable for multiplexed operation and for remote control, compatible with NFC technology, etc., and in many cases a clear and promising alternative to optical sensors. The presented areas concern sensing challenges in medical diagnostics with an example for detecting general antibody-antigen interactions, for the monitoring of toxins and pathogens in food and feed stuff, exemplified by the detection of aflatoxins, and the area of smell sensors, which are certainly the most exciting development as there are very few existing examples in which the typically small and hydrophobic odorant molecules can be detected by other means. The example given here concerns the recording of a honey flavor (and a cancer marker for neuroblastoma), homovanillic acid, by the odorant binding protein OBP 14 from the honey bee, immobilized on the reduced graphene oxide gate of an FET sensor. View Full-Text
Keywords: reduced graphene oxide (rGO graphene); FET; liquid-gate; biosensing; receptor immobilization; antigen-antibody interaction; food toxins; aflatoxins; odorant-binding proteins; olfaction; smell sensor reduced graphene oxide (rGO graphene); FET; liquid-gate; biosensing; receptor immobilization; antigen-antibody interaction; food toxins; aflatoxins; odorant-binding proteins; olfaction; smell sensor
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Reiner-Rozman, C.; Kotlowski, C.; Knoll, W. Electronic Biosensing with Functionalized rGO FETs. Biosensors 2016, 6, 17.

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