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Information 2018, 9(5), 118; https://doi.org/10.3390/info9050118

When Robots Get Bored and Invent Team Sports: A More Suitable Test than the Turing Test?

Independent Researcher, V8V 1S9 Victoria, Canada
Received: 9 April 2018 / Revised: 5 May 2018 / Accepted: 8 May 2018 / Published: 11 May 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue AI AND THE SINGULARITY: A FALLACY OR A GREAT OPPORTUNITY?)
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Abstract

Increasingly, the Turing test—which is used to show that artificial intelligence has achieved human-level intelligence—is being regarded as an insufficient indicator of human-level intelligence. This essay extends arguments that embodied intelligence is required for human-level intelligence, and proposes a more suitable test for determining human-level intelligence: the invention of team sports by humanoid robots. The test is preferred because team sport activity is easily identified, uniquely human, and is suggested to emerge in basic, controllable conditions. To expect humanoid robots to self-organize, or invent, team sport as a function of human-level artificial intelligence, the following necessary conditions are proposed: humanoid robots must have the capacity to participate in cooperative-competitive interactions, instilled by algorithms for resource acquisition; they must possess or acquire sufficient stores of energetic resources that permit leisure time, thus reducing competition for scarce resources and increasing cooperative tendencies; and they must possess a heterogeneous range of energetic capacities. When present, these factors allow robot collectives to spontaneously invent team sport activities and thereby demonstrate one fundamental indicator of human-level intelligence. View Full-Text
Keywords: artificial intelligence; Turing test; embodiment; competition; cooperation; self-organization; robots; heterogeneity; team sports artificial intelligence; Turing test; embodiment; competition; cooperation; self-organization; robots; heterogeneity; team sports
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Trenchard, H. When Robots Get Bored and Invent Team Sports: A More Suitable Test than the Turing Test? Information 2018, 9, 118.

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