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Challenges 2018, 9(2), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/challe9020030

The Value of Global Indigenous Knowledge in Planetary Health

1
Arctic Indigenous Wellness Foundation, Yellowknife, NT X1A 2P1, Canada
2
inVIVO Planetary Health, The Worldwide Universities Network (WUN), West New York, NJ 07093, USA
Received: 10 July 2018 / Accepted: 19 July 2018 / Published: 26 July 2018
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Abstract

In order to fulfill a broader vision of health and wellness, the World Health Organization (WHO) 2014–2023 strategy for global health has outlined a culturally sensitive blending of conventional biomedicine with traditional forms of healing. At the same time, scientists working in various fields—from anthropology and ecology to biology and climatology—are validating and demonstrating the utility of Indigenous knowledge. There is a misperception that Indigenous peoples are in need of Westernized science in order to “legitimize” our knowledge systems. The Lancet Planetary Health Commission report calls for the “training of indigenous and other local community members” in order to “help protect health and biodiversity” (p. 2007). Such calls have merit but appear authoritarian when they sit (unbalanced) without equally loud calls for the training of (socially dominant) westernized in-groups by Indigenous groups “in order to help protect health and biodiversity.” The problems of planetary health are both profound and complex; solutions can be found in a greater understanding of the self and the universe and the land as a medicine place. The following message was delivered as part of a keynote at the inVIVO Planetary Health Conference in Canmore, Alberta, Canada—20 points of consideration for a planetary health science in its pure, raw form, on behalf of the Indigenous elders. View Full-Text
Keywords: planetary health; indigenous health; spirituality; knowledge translation; justice; health equity; cultural competency; environmental health; ecology planetary health; indigenous health; spirituality; knowledge translation; justice; health equity; cultural competency; environmental health; ecology
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Redvers, N. The Value of Global Indigenous Knowledge in Planetary Health. Challenges 2018, 9, 30.

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