Next Article in Journal
Freshwater Diatoms as Indicators of Combined Long-Term Mining and Urban Stressors in Junction Creek (Ontario, Canada)
Previous Article in Journal
Tailings Dams Failures: Updated Statistical Model for Discharge Volume and Runout
Article Menu
Issue 2 (February) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Environments 2018, 5(2), 29; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments5020029

Combining Co-Benefits and Stakeholders Perceptions into Green Infrastructure Selection for Flood Risk Reduction

1
UNESCO-IHE, Institute for Water Education, Westvest 7, 2611 AX Delft, The Netherlands
2
School of Engineering and Technology, Asian Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 4 Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120, Thailand
3
College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physics, University of Exeter, EX4 4QF Exeter, UK
4
Faculty of Civil Engineering, Department of Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering, University of Belgrade, Bulevar kralja Aleksandra 73, 11000 Beograd, Serbia
5
Hydro and Agro Informatics Institute (HAII), Khwaeng Thanon Phaya Thai, Khet Ratchathewi, Krung Thep Maha Nakhon, Bangkok 10400, Thailand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 12 December 2017 / Revised: 6 February 2018 / Accepted: 9 February 2018 / Published: 18 February 2018
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [4897 KB, uploaded 23 February 2018]   |  

Abstract

An important increase in flood risk levels is expected in future decades in many areas around the globe. In addition, the traditional approaches for flood management offer options with low sustainability. As a response, the use of non-traditional drainage measures, also called green infrastructures, has been increasingly suggested in the last years. One important reason for their increasing popularity has been the co-benefits that they offer to the environment. The development of an efficient planning for sustainable urban drainage systems is a complex process that needs the involvement of multiple stakeholders. Moreover, the measures to be adopted should be evaluated considering their potential to achieve multiple benefits related to human well-being, rather than just to flood risk management. In this work, we propose a framework for the selection of green infrastructures on the basis of a co-benefits analysis. The aim is to include the achievement of co-benefits and human well-being into decision-making for flood management, considering the stakeholders’ perceptions to define the most important benefits to be enhanced. The application of the framework presented here to a case study in Ayutthaya, Thailand, shows the importance of including different stakeholder’s opinions. In addition, it shows that decision makers should consider locally defined co-benefits as well as flood risk reduction when defining which green infrastructures to apply. View Full-Text
Keywords: co-benefits; flood risk management; green infrastructure; decision-making; stakeholders’ analysis; ecosystem services; human well-being co-benefits; flood risk management; green infrastructure; decision-making; stakeholders’ analysis; ecosystem services; human well-being
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Alves, A.; Patiño Gómez, J.; Vojinovic, Z.; Sánchez, A.; Weesakul, S. Combining Co-Benefits and Stakeholders Perceptions into Green Infrastructure Selection for Flood Risk Reduction. Environments 2018, 5, 29.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Environments EISSN 2076-3298 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top