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Environments 2015, 2(4), 449-470; doi:10.3390/environments2040449

Consumers’ Willingness to Pay for Cabbage with Minimized Pesticide Residues in Southern Benin

1
Centre Régional pour la Promotion Agricole (CeRPA), Abomey-Calavi 01 BP 477, Benin
2
Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, University of Abomey-Calavi, Cotonou 01 BP 526, Benin
3
Institut National des Recherches Agricoles du Bénin (INRAB), Cotonou 01 BP 884, Benin
4
Agricultural Research for Development, UR Hortsys, Montpellier Cedex 5, France
5
Plant Health Department, International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE), Nairobi P.O. Box 30772 - 00100, Kenya
6
Department of Horticulture, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
7
The Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University, Darwin 0909, Australia
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Yu-Pin Lin
Received: 20 June 2015 / Revised: 10 August 2015 / Accepted: 16 September 2015 / Published: 1 October 2015
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Abstract

Cabbage (Brassicaceae) is one of the most frequently consumed exotic vegetables in Benin and also the most affected by insects. To meet growing food demand, farmers rely heavily on synthetic pesticides that are harmful for themselves, consumers and the environment. Integrated pest management has been proposed as the means to improve vegetable productivity and quality in many developing countries. One approach is to substitute pesticides with physical barriers to insects, like nets. Here, we assess consumers’ perceptions about cabbage and their purchasing behavior towards cabbage that was produced using these nets in two major cities in Benin. Results indicate that consumers are aware of the health risks associated with intensive use of pesticides but were not able to recognize the quality difference between cabbage produced under nets from those using pesticides. All consumers were willing to pay a price premium for cabbage with minimized pesticides residues compared with conventionally produced cabbage, the average premium being 38%. Women, older, highly educated consumers and those able to distinguish cabbage qualities were willing to pay the most. We suggest that farmers will obtain higher prices if their production of cabbage with preferred characteristics is accompanied by an improved marketing strategy. View Full-Text
Keywords: contingent valuation; eco-friendly production; healthy food; IPM; premium price; purchasing decision; West Africa contingent valuation; eco-friendly production; healthy food; IPM; premium price; purchasing decision; West Africa
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Vidogbéna, F.; Adégbidi, A.; Tossou, R.; Assogba-Komlan, F.; Martin, T.; Ngouajio, M.; Simon, S.; Parrot, L.; Zander, K.K. Consumers’ Willingness to Pay for Cabbage with Minimized Pesticide Residues in Southern Benin. Environments 2015, 2, 449-470.

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