Next Article in Journal / Special Issue
The Opportunity for High-Performance Biomaterials from Methane
Previous Article in Journal
Acknowledgement to Reviewers of Microorganisms in 2015
Previous Article in Special Issue
Metagenomic Analyses Reveal That Energy Transfer Gene Abundances Can Predict the Syntrophic Potential of Environmental Microbial Communities
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Microorganisms 2016, 4(1), 10; doi:10.3390/microorganisms4010010

Aspergillus oryzaeSaccharomyces cerevisiae Consortium Allows Bio-Hybrid Fuel Cell to Run on Complex Carbohydrates

Army Research Laboratory, 2800 Powder Mill Road, Adelphi, MD 20740, USA
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Willy Verstraete
Received: 1 November 2015 / Revised: 19 January 2016 / Accepted: 26 January 2016 / Published: 4 February 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbial Resource Management)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [788 KB, uploaded 4 February 2016]   |  

Abstract

Consortia of Aspergillus oryzae and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are examined for their abilities to turn complex carbohydrates into ethanol. To understand the interactions between microorganisms in consortia, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy is used to follow the concentrations of various metabolites such as sugars (e.g., glucose, maltose), longer chain carbohydrates, and ethanol to optimize consortia conditions for the production of ethanol. It is shown that with proper design A. oryzae can digest food waste simulants into soluble sugars that S. cerevisiae can ferment into ethanol. Depending on the substrate and conditions used, concentrations of 13% ethanol were achieved in 10 days. It is further shown that a direct alcohol fuel cell (FC) can be coupled with these A. oryzae-enabled S. cerevisiae fermentations using a reverse osmosis membrane. This “bio-hybrid FC” continually extracted ethanol from an ongoing consortium, enhancing ethanol production and allowing the bio-hybrid FC to run for at least one week. Obtained bio-hybrid FC currents were comparable to those from pure ethanol—water mixtures, using the same FC. The A. oryzae–S. cerevisiae consortium, coupled to a bio-hybrid FC, converted food waste simulants into electricity without any pre- or post-processing. View Full-Text
Keywords: Aspergillus oryzae; mold; Saccharomyces cerevisiae; yeast; consortium; bio-hybrid; fuel cell; carbohydrate; FTIR Aspergillus oryzae; mold; Saccharomyces cerevisiae; yeast; consortium; bio-hybrid; fuel cell; carbohydrate; FTIR
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Jahnke, J.P.; Hoyt, T.; LeFors, H.M.; Sumner, J.J.; Mackie, D.M. Aspergillus oryzaeSaccharomyces cerevisiae Consortium Allows Bio-Hybrid Fuel Cell to Run on Complex Carbohydrates. Microorganisms 2016, 4, 10.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Microorganisms EISSN 2076-2607 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top