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Humanities 2017, 6(4), 88; doi:10.3390/h6040088

Trauma, Postmemory, and Empathy: The Migrant Crisis and the German Past in Jenny Erpenbeck’s Gehen, ging, gegangen [Go, Went, Gone]

Department of International Studies, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia
Academic Editor: Gail Finney
Received: 25 September 2017 / Revised: 6 November 2017 / Accepted: 7 November 2017 / Published: 11 November 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wounded: Studies in Literary and Cinematic Trauma)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [240 KB, uploaded 11 November 2017]

Abstract

The novel Gehen, ging, gegangen [Go, Went, Gone] by the celebrated German writer Jenny Erpenbeck was published at the height of the European refugee crisis. The novel tells the tale of Richard, a retired Berlin classics professor, who becomes intrigued by the Oranienplatz refugee protest camp. He initially approaches the refugee crisis as a new research project, methodically searching for secondary literature, composing questionnaires and conducting interviews with asylum seekers, but eventually he begins to develop friendships with some of them. Throughout the novel, Richard, who fled from the approaching Red Army with his mother as a baby and then lived in the German Democratic Republic (GDR) until reunification, notices similarities between the traumatic experiences of the Oranienplatz protesters and the trauma in his personal history, German collective history, and ancient and medieval literature. This article focuses on trauma and empathy in Gehen, ging, gegangen, exploring how the parallels drawn between the varied fates of the asylum seekers and the stories of exile and displacement in the literary canon, and German historical experiences of displacement and loss of home, establish points of empathic connection between Richard and the refugees, and attempt to establish the same between the reader and the refugees. View Full-Text
Keywords: trauma; postmemory; empathy; German literature; refugee; Erpenbeck; Gehen, ging, gegangen; Go, Went, Gone trauma; postmemory; empathy; German literature; refugee; Erpenbeck; Gehen, ging, gegangen; Go, Went, Gone
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Stone, B. Trauma, Postmemory, and Empathy: The Migrant Crisis and the German Past in Jenny Erpenbeck’s Gehen, ging, gegangen [Go, Went, Gone]. Humanities 2017, 6, 88.

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