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Humanities 2016, 5(2), 40; doi:10.3390/h5020040

Baba Yaga, Monsters of the Week, and Pop Culture’s Formation of Wonder and Families through Monstrosity

1
Department of English, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602, USA
2
Independent Scholar, Provo, UT 84601, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Claudia Schwabe
Received: 15 March 2016 / Revised: 16 May 2016 / Accepted: 24 May 2016 / Published: 3 June 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fairy Tale and its Uses in Contemporary New Media and Popular Culture)
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Abstract

This paper considers transforming forms and their purposes in the popular culture trope of the televised Monster of the Week (MOTW). In the rare televised appearances outside of Slavic nations, Baba Yaga tends to show up in MOTW episodes. While some MOTW are contemporary inventions, many, like Baba Yaga, are mythological and fantastic creatures from folk narratives. Employing the concept of the folkloresque, we explore how contemporary audiovisual tropes gain integrity and traction by indexing traditional knowledge and belief systems. In the process, we examine key affordances of these forms involving the possibilities of wonder and the portability of tradition. Using digital humanities methods, we built a “monster typology” by scraping lists of folk creatures, mythological beasts, and other supernatural beings from online information sources, and we used topic modeling to investigate central concerns of MOTW series. Our findings indicate connections in these shows between crime, violence, family, and loss. The trope formulates wonder and families through folk narrative and monster forms and functions. We recognize Baba Yaga’s role as villain in these episodes and acknowledge that these series also shift between episodic and serial narrative arcs involving close relationships between characters and among viewers and fans. View Full-Text
Keywords: fairy tale; popular culture; television; intermediality; wonder; families; folkloresque; formalism; digital humanities fairy tale; popular culture; television; intermediality; wonder; families; folkloresque; formalism; digital humanities
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Rudy, J.T.; McDonald, J.L. Baba Yaga, Monsters of the Week, and Pop Culture’s Formation of Wonder and Families through Monstrosity. Humanities 2016, 5, 40.

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