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Humanities 2015, 4(4), 861-884; doi:10.3390/h4040861

“Oh, this is What It Feels Like”: A Role for the Body in Learning an Evidence-Based Practice

1
School of Education and Human Development, University of Colorado Denver, Campus Box 106, PO Box 173364, Denver, CO 80217-3364, USA
2
Department of Psychological Sciences at Birkbeck, University of London, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX, UK
3
School of Social Work, Dalhousie University, 6420 Coburg Road, PO Box 15000 Halifax, NS B3H 4R2, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Sara Horton-Deutsch and Pamela Ironside
Received: 23 September 2015 / Revised: 19 November 2015 / Accepted: 19 November 2015 / Published: 27 November 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Humanities in Health Professions Education and Practice)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [232 KB, uploaded 27 November 2015]

Abstract

This paper will present research that explored the experiences of couple and family therapists learning about and using an evidence-based practice (EBP). Using a phenomenological approach called Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis, three themes emerged from the participants’ experiences: the supports and challenges while learning an EBP, the experience of shame while learning, and the embodiment of a therapy practice. This paper will focus on the theme of embodiment. Research participants’ experiences will be reviewed and further explored using Merleau-Ponty’s notion of embodiment and Gendlin’s (1978) more internally focused understanding of how awareness of a felt sense is experienced as a move “inside of a person”. As researchers, educators, administrators, policy makers, and counsellors struggle with what works best with which populations and when, how best to allocate resources, how best to educate and support counsellors, and the complexity of doing research in real-life settings, this research has the potential to contribute to those varied dialogues. View Full-Text
Keywords: Interpretative phenomenological analysis; family therapy; couple therapy; evidence-based practice; embodiment Interpretative phenomenological analysis; family therapy; couple therapy; evidence-based practice; embodiment
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Allan, R.; Eatough, V.; Ungar, M. “Oh, this is What It Feels Like”: A Role for the Body in Learning an Evidence-Based Practice. Humanities 2015, 4, 861-884.

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