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Soc. Sci. 2018, 7(2), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci7020017

The Boys Club: Engineering a More Positive Environment for Women in Male-Dominated Majors

1
Department of Psychology, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602, USA
2
Burrell College of Osteopathic Medicine, 3501 Arrowhead Dr, Las Cruces, NM 88001, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 15 December 2017 / Revised: 24 January 2018 / Accepted: 24 January 2018 / Published: 26 January 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Women in Male-Dominated Domains)
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Abstract

Sexual harassment has been widely studied in the workforce, but the factors that contribute to hostile educational environments for women have received less attention. The present study focuses on male dominance, gender harassment, gender threats, masculinity, and their influences on creating a hostile environment for women in academia. One hundred and forty-two male participants from a private university in the Southwestern United States self-reported their masculinity, completed a group task with a female confederate leader serving as a gender threat in half the conditions, and had their subsequent affect, perceptions of leadership effectiveness, and behavioral aggression measured. Men from male-dominated majors and men who had received a gender threat did not differ from men from gender-equivalent majors and men who had not received a gender threat on affect, perceptions of leadership effectiveness, or behavioral aggression (ps > 0.201, ηp2s ≤ 0.007). However, post-hoc analyses revealed that as masculinity increased among men from male-dominated majors under gender threat, they became significantly more behaviorally aggressive (b = 5.92, p = 0.003) and perceived their female leader as less effective (b = −0.83, p = 0.076). Implications and suggestions for future research are discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: behavioral aggression; course selection; gender; gender threat; hostile environment; male dominance; masculinity; sexual harassment; STEM behavioral aggression; course selection; gender; gender threat; hostile environment; male dominance; masculinity; sexual harassment; STEM
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Dresden, B.E.; Dresden, A.Y.; Ridge, R.D. The Boys Club: Engineering a More Positive Environment for Women in Male-Dominated Majors. Soc. Sci. 2018, 7, 17.

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