Next Article in Journal
Making Communication Strategy Choices in a Fast Evolving Crisis Situation—Results from a Table-Top Discussion on an Anthrax Scenario
Next Article in Special Issue
Domestic Violence against Albanian Immigrant Women in Greece: Facing Patriarchy
Previous Article in Journal
The Fragility of Gender Equality Policies in Spain
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Soc. Sci. 2016, 5(2), 18; doi:10.3390/socsci5020018

Masculinities in Cyberspace: An Analysis of Portrayals of Manhood in Men’s Rights Activist Websites

1
Department of Sociology & Anthropology, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Edinburg, TX 78539, USA
2
Department of Sociology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Christine M. Robinson and Sue Spivey
Received: 12 April 2016 / Revised: 4 May 2016 / Accepted: 6 May 2016 / Published: 12 May 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Backlash: Contemporary Obstructions to Social Justice)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [228 KB, uploaded 12 May 2016]

Abstract

A growth in cultural ideologies concerned with men and masculinities in contemporary American society has recently emerged. Men’s rights activist (MRA) groups embody a movement emphasizing the crisis of masculinity. Despite men’s privileged societal status, MRAs seek to establish resources for men to utilize in elevating their perceived subordinated position in society in relation to women and social minorities. Little research has systematically investigated MRAs on the Internet, which is rapidly becoming a primary source of information and social connectedness for people. Through a content analysis of the 12 most prominent MRA websites, we explore the various strategies used by contemporary men’s groups designed to provide support for men in their pursuit of social legitimacy and power. Two primary categories of MRAs with distinctive ideological strategies emerged from this analysis: Cyber Lads in Search of Masculinity and Virtual Victims in Search of Equality. Though both groups promoted men’s entitlement to social power, Cyber Lads utilized themes of explicit aggression towards and devaluation of women, while Virtual Victims adopted political and social movement rhetoric to address men’s issues. The implications of these websites are discussed in terms of gender equality and their potential effects on individual men and women. View Full-Text
Keywords: men’s rights; masculinity; manhood; websites; content analysis men’s rights; masculinity; manhood; websites; content analysis
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Schmitz, R.M.; Kazyak, E. Masculinities in Cyberspace: An Analysis of Portrayals of Manhood in Men’s Rights Activist Websites. Soc. Sci. 2016, 5, 18.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Soc. Sci. EISSN 2076-0760 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top