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Soc. Sci. 2015, 4(4), 1118-1126; doi:10.3390/socsci4041118

Dead Spaces, Living Architecture and the Functionality of Death in Post-Conflict Settings

Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Ottawa, 120 University, Ottawa K1N 6N5, Canada
Academic Editors: Steve Fuller and Emilie Whitaker
Received: 30 June 2015 / Revised: 2 November 2015 / Accepted: 12 November 2015 / Published: 20 November 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Beyond the Negativity of Death: Towards a New Necropolitics)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [642 KB, uploaded 20 November 2015]

Abstract

Death has the ability to influence an architectural site in such a way that it defines its identity. Bullet holes, political graffiti, and scarred buildings are evidence of past events that have involved death and continue to do so. However, recognizing death through these sites allows post-conflict nations a chance to construct a narrative that was once hidden away. These sites allow death to function in a positive manner—if amnesia-driven urban development projects do not erase them first, that is. View Full-Text
Keywords: death; architecture; memory; reconciliation; narrative; post-conflict; amnesia; urban development death; architecture; memory; reconciliation; narrative; post-conflict; amnesia; urban development
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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El Richani, D. Dead Spaces, Living Architecture and the Functionality of Death in Post-Conflict Settings. Soc. Sci. 2015, 4, 1118-1126.

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