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Soc. Sci., Volume 2, Issue 2 (June 2013), Pages 40-113

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Research

Open AccessArticle Understanding the Economic Integration of Immigrants: A Wage Decomposition of the Earnings Disparities between Native-Born Canadians and Recent Immigrant Cohorts
Soc. Sci. 2013, 2(2), 40-61; doi:10.3390/socsci2020040
Received: 25 February 2013 / Revised: 28 March 2013 / Accepted: 28 March 2013 / Published: 9 April 2013
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (168 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study assesses whether characteristics relating to ethnic identity and social inclusion influence the earnings of recent immigrants in Canada. Past research has revealed that relevant predictors of immigrant earnings include structural and demographic characteristics, educational credentials and employment-related characteristics. However, due [...] Read more.
This study assesses whether characteristics relating to ethnic identity and social inclusion influence the earnings of recent immigrants in Canada. Past research has revealed that relevant predictors of immigrant earnings include structural and demographic characteristics, educational credentials and employment-related characteristics. However, due to the unavailability of situational and agency variables in existing surveys, past research has generally been unable to account for the impact of such characteristics on the economic integration of immigrants. Drawing on data from Statistics Canada's Ethnic Diversity Survey, this paper builds on previous research by identifying the relative extent to which sociodemographic, educational and ethnic identity characteristics explain earnings differences between immigrants of two recent cohorts and native-born Canadians. The results indicate that immigrants are disadvantaged in the labor market in terms of characteristics relating to sociodemographics and ethnic identity, but are advantaged in terms of human capital. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in the Social Sciences)
Open AccessArticle Community Perceptions of Criminality: The Case of the Maltese Walled City of Bormla
Soc. Sci. 2013, 2(2), 62-77; doi:10.3390/socsci2020062
Received: 4 February 2013 / Revised: 12 April 2013 / Accepted: 15 April 2013 / Published: 16 April 2013
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Abstract
This paper explores the situational factors that explain why crime in Bormla occurs in certain areas and not others. Bormla, one of the oldest cities in Malta, is the fifth crime hotspot on the Maltese Islands. The objective of this paper is [...] Read more.
This paper explores the situational factors that explain why crime in Bormla occurs in certain areas and not others. Bormla, one of the oldest cities in Malta, is the fifth crime hotspot on the Maltese Islands. The objective of this paper is to find out whether socio-demographic aspects and/or other contextual aspects are linked with the rate and type of crime that takes place within this city. A multi-method approach was adopted for the purposes of this paper. Statistics issued by the Malta police were analysed to find out which criminal offences occur there, and in which location. This analysis took place with the help of Geographic Information System (GIS) software. Qualitative and quantitative data collected through a needs assessment exercise conducted with a sample of Bormla respondents in 2009 and 2010 was also analysed to find out whether residents concurred with this official picture of what type of crime takes place there, and where it occurs. Residents were also asked whether they felt safe living in this crime hotspot, when and where they felt safe, and why. Full article
Open AccessArticle Greek Exit from the Crisis—A Pressing and Much-Needed Public Service Reform
Soc. Sci. 2013, 2(2), 78-90; doi:10.3390/socsci2020078
Received: 1 February 2013 / Revised: 19 April 2013 / Accepted: 19 April 2013 / Published: 23 April 2013
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (83 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Greece is in a deep crisis; the worst in all of Europe and the worst experienced in 45 years. Greece is no stranger to crises, but most have been exogenous: the Second World War and the Cold War, for instance. Sadly, unlike [...] Read more.
Greece is in a deep crisis; the worst in all of Europe and the worst experienced in 45 years. Greece is no stranger to crises, but most have been exogenous: the Second World War and the Cold War, for instance. Sadly, unlike these crises, the present one is home-made. The wounds that it has caused are largely self-inflicted. It is especially difficult to fathom the logic of strikes by public service unions—repeated, relentless and militant. They paralyzed the country, drove investors and tourists away and added to the burdens that the economy and the people have had to bear. These strikes, and some public servants’ attitudes in the face of the crisis itself, brought into sharp relief the serious capacity deficit in the Greek administrative system, which has been at the root of the problem the country is currently facing. This statement begs the question: how can that be? What, after 30 years of public service reform, presumed to modernize and help the country approximate the standards embedded in the Common European Administrative Space? The paper will suggest that the reforms of the 1980s were only superficially reforms to improve the effectiveness and quality of the Service. Like parallel changes in higher education, the principal objective was harnessing officialdom, and as many voters as possible, to the chariot of PASOK—the political party established by Andreas Papandreou—which effectively governed the country for most of the period in question. The lesson from this experience may be none other, in fact, than clear convincing proof that partisan concerns and institution-building seldom make a good combination. For Greece, in light of the crisis, effective integration in the EU remains a daunting challenge. It calls for bold reforms, but these must be undertaken with institution-building, the country’s general interest, and long term needs in mind. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Eurozone Crisis: A Multidisciplinary Perspective)
Open AccessArticle Interactions in Generalized Linear Models: Theoretical Issues and an Application to Personal Vote-Earning Attributes
Soc. Sci. 2013, 2(2), 91-113; doi:10.3390/socsci2020091
Received: 7 February 2013 / Revised: 23 April 2013 / Accepted: 25 April 2013 / Published: 7 May 2013
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (510 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
There is some confusion in political science, and the social sciences in general, about the meaning and interpretation of interaction effects in models with non-interval, non-normal outcome variables. Often these terms are casually thrown into a model specification without observing that their [...] Read more.
There is some confusion in political science, and the social sciences in general, about the meaning and interpretation of interaction effects in models with non-interval, non-normal outcome variables. Often these terms are casually thrown into a model specification without observing that their presence fundamentally changes the interpretation of the resulting coefficients. This article explains the conditional nature of reported coefficients in models with interactions, defining the necessarily different interpretation required by generalized linear models. Methodological issues are illustrated with an application to voter information structured by electoral systems and resulting legislative behavior and democratic representation in comparative politics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in the Social Sciences)

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