Next Article in Journal
The Political Potential of the Return Directive
Previous Article in Journal
Is the Modern American Death Penalty a Fatal Lottery? Texas as a Conservative Test
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Laws 2014, 3(1), 106-116; doi:10.3390/laws3010106

Online Dispute Resolution (ODR) within Developing Nations: A Qualitative Evaluation of Transfer and Impact

1
Graduate School of Education and Psychology, Pepperdine University, 6100 Center Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90045, USA
2
National Centre for Technology and Dispute Resolution, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, Amherst, MA 01003, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 16 December 2013 / Revised: 21 January 2014 / Accepted: 21 January 2014 / Published: 22 January 2014
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [54 KB, uploaded 22 January 2014]

Abstract

The field of online dispute resolution (ODR) is developing both as practice and a profession. Evidence of this includes a growing community of scholars and practitioners. A Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) grant permitted 16 practitioners from developing countries to attend the 2008 ODR Forum in Victoria, British Columbia. In the year following the Forum, an evaluation was conducted to identify changes among these practitioners’ behaviors, knowledge, skills, abilities and credibility. Results indicate that ODR practitioners in developing countries are engaged in a wide range of activities, many of which are technologically and logistically complex. These practitioners also face a number of political and infrastructural challenges that are not as commonly experienced by those from developed nations. Taken together, these realities have implications both for the nature of ODR’s proliferation as a legitimate practice, as well as for the provision of education and training concerning its underpinnings.
Keywords: technology; international dispute resolution; culture; qualitative; case study; information and communications technology; developing countries; online dispute resolution; CIDA technology; international dispute resolution; culture; qualitative; case study; information and communications technology; developing countries; online dispute resolution; CIDA
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Leigh, D.; Fowlie, F. Online Dispute Resolution (ODR) within Developing Nations: A Qualitative Evaluation of Transfer and Impact. Laws 2014, 3, 106-116.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Laws EISSN 2075-471X Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top