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Minerals 2018, 8(2), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/min8020036

Different Erionite Species Bind Iron into the Structure: A Potential Explanation for Fibrous Erionite Toxicity

1
Department of Earth Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome, Piazzale A. Moro 5, I-00185 Rome, Italy
2
ENEA, Casaccia Research Centre, via Anguillarese 301, S. Maria di Galeria, I-00123 Rome, Italy
3
Department of Chemistry, Sapienza University of Rome, Piazzale A. Moro 5, I-00185 Rome, Italy
4
Department of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Urbino Carlo Bo, Piazza della Repubblica 13, I-61029 Urbino, PU, Italy
5
Rectorial Laboratory Fibres and Inorganic Particulate, Sapienza University of Rome, Piazzale A. Moro 5, I-00185 Rome, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 29 December 2017 / Revised: 17 January 2018 / Accepted: 18 January 2018 / Published: 23 January 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occurrence, Crystal-Chemistry and Properties of Fibrous Minerals)
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Abstract

In this investigation, the crystal chemical characterization of one sample of woolly erionite-K (Lander County, NV, USA) was examined after suspension in a FeCl2 solution, in anaerobic conditions. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the chemical composition of erionite on its efficiency to bind iron. Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) results showed that the sample bound Fe(II) through an ion-exchange mechanism mainly involving Ca. In addition, chemical and structural data indicated that Fe(II) is fixed at the Ca3 site, six-fold coordinated to water molecules. According to Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) sample surface area the amount of Fe(II) bound by the fibers was comparable with that retrieved for fibrous erionite-Na sample from Rome (OR, USA) for which the ion-exchange process mainly affected Na. This finding provides clear evidence of a strong tendency of Fe(II) to bind to the erionite structure. Furthermore, considering that the woolly erionite-K from Langer County differs markedly from erionite-Na from Rome in the extra-framework cation content, our observations indicate that the Fe binding efficiency is not significantly modulated by the chemical composition. Notably, Fe ion-exchanged and/or accumulated on the fiber surface can generate hydroxyl radicals via the Fenton reaction, thus influencing the potential carcinogenicity of the different erionite species. View Full-Text
Keywords: erionite species; toxicity; Fe(II) binding; cation exchange; ICP-OES erionite species; toxicity; Fe(II) binding; cation exchange; ICP-OES
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Pacella, A.; Cremisini, C.; Nardi, E.; Montereali, M.R.; Pettiti, I.; Giordani, M.; Mattioli, M.; Ballirano, P. Different Erionite Species Bind Iron into the Structure: A Potential Explanation for Fibrous Erionite Toxicity. Minerals 2018, 8, 36.

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