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Symmetry 2017, 9(5), 66; doi:10.3390/sym9050066

The Genetics of Asymmetry: Whole Exome Sequencing in a Consanguineous Turkish Family with an Overrepresentation of Left-Handedness

1
Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, Biopsychology, Ruhr-University, 44780 Bochum, Germany
2
Department of Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, Dokuz Eylül University, 35340 Izmir, Turkey
3
Department of Medical Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Dokuz Eylül University, 35340 Izmir, Turkey
4
Genetic Psychology, Faculty of Psychology, Ruhr-University, 44780 Bochum, Germany
These authors contributed equally.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Lesley Rogers
Received: 9 March 2017 / Revised: 27 April 2017 / Accepted: 27 April 2017 / Published: 1 May 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Brain Asymmetry of Structure and/or Function)
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Abstract

Handedness is the most pronounced behavioral asymmetry in humans. Genome-wide association studies have largely failed to identify genetic loci associated with phenotypic variance in handedness, supporting the idea that the trait is determined by a multitude of small, possibly interacting genetic and non-genetic influences. However, these studies typically are not capable of detecting influences of rare mutations on handedness. Here, we used whole exome sequencing in a Turkish family with history of consanguinity and overrepresentation of left-handedness and performed quantitative trait analysis with handedness lateralization quotient as a phenotype. While rare variants on different loci showed significant association with the phenotype, none was functionally relevant for handedness. This finding was further confirmed by gene ontology group analysis. Taken together, our results add further evidence to the suggestion that there is no major gene or mutation that causes left-handedness. View Full-Text
Keywords: handedness; hemispheric asymmetries; genetics; ontogenesis; consanguineous marriage handedness; hemispheric asymmetries; genetics; ontogenesis; consanguineous marriage
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Ocklenburg, S.; Barutçuoğlu, C.; Özgören, A.Ö.; Özgören, M.; Erdal, E.; Moser, D.; Schmitz, J.; Kumsta, R.; Güntürkün, O. The Genetics of Asymmetry: Whole Exome Sequencing in a Consanguineous Turkish Family with an Overrepresentation of Left-Handedness. Symmetry 2017, 9, 66.

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