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Atmosphere 2014, 5(3), 669-685; doi:10.3390/atmos5030669

Estimation of Emissions from Sugarcane Field Burning in Thailand Using Bottom-Up Country-Specific Activity Data

1
The Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment, King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi and Centre of Excellence for Energy Technology and Environment, Ministry of Education, Bangkok 10140, Thailand
2
Faculty of Agriculture, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900, Thailand
3
Field Crops Research Institute, Department of Agriculture, Bangkok 10900, Thailand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 27 May 2014 / Revised: 1 September 2014 / Accepted: 12 September 2014 / Published: 23 September 2014
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Abstract

Open burning in sugarcane fields is recognized as a major source of air pollution. However, the assessment of its emission intensity in many regions of the world still lacks information, especially regarding country-specific activity data including biomass fuel load and combustion factor. A site survey was conducted covering 13 sugarcane plantations subject to different farm management practices and climatic conditions. The results showed that pre-harvest and post-harvest burnings are the two main practices followed in Thailand. In 2012, the total production of sugarcane biomass fuel, i.e., dead, dry and fresh leaves, amounted to 10.15 million tonnes, which is equivalent to a fuel density of 0.79 kg∙m−2. The average combustion factor for the pre-harvest and post-harvest burning systems was determined to be 0.64 and 0.83, respectively. Emissions from sugarcane field burning were estimated using the bottom-up country-specific values from the site survey of this study and the results compared with those obtained using default values from the 2006 IPCC Guidelines. The comparison showed that the use of default values lead to underestimating the overall emissions by up to 30% as emissions from post-harvest burning are not accounted for, but it is the second most common practice followed in Thailand. View Full-Text
Keywords: sugarcane; open burning; biomass burning; residue to product ratio; biomass load; sugarcane biomass fuel; combustion factor; combustion efficiency; emission inventory sugarcane; open burning; biomass burning; residue to product ratio; biomass load; sugarcane biomass fuel; combustion factor; combustion efficiency; emission inventory
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Sornpoon, W.; Bonnet, S.; Kasemsap, P.; Prasertsak, P.; Garivait, S. Estimation of Emissions from Sugarcane Field Burning in Thailand Using Bottom-Up Country-Specific Activity Data. Atmosphere 2014, 5, 669-685.

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